A rotating skyscraper is on the drawing board for 2020

Renting an apartment in this shape-shifting tower would be revolutionary.

"Shifting perspectives" is about to get a whole new meaning thanks to a tower set to rise in Dubai.

That's because the 1,375-foot-tall Dynamic Tower will feature units that rotate 360 degrees, offering constantly changing views of the city.

The Dynamic Tower in Dubai lights up at night.The Dynamic Tower would be the world's first prefabricated skyscraper. (Photo: Dynamic Architecture)

The brainchild of David Fisher, an Israeli architect now based in Italy, his inspiration lay in the idea that "the motionless state of today's houses does not reflect people's actual lives, where everything is constantly changing."

The units, attached to a concrete core, will move slowly, making one full revolution every three hours. Fisher said that occupants may not even notice the rotation.

The Dynamic Tower in DubaiThe Dynamic Tower will rise 1,375 feet, with each of its apartments capable of rotating individually around a concrete core. (Photo: Dynamic Architecture)

They will also have the option to take manual control of the apartment's movement through voice activation. So, say you're tired of sitting in the beating sun, you can rotate to a shadier position.

Fisher's innovative design also takes into account its environmental footprint. The building will provide its own power, with wind turbines placed inside two-foot gaps between each floor. Fisher, a native of the Israeli coastal city of Tel Aviv, said the building will basically double as a power station and even be able to provide electricity to neighbors.

One of the Dynamic Tower's prefabricated apartments.Each floor of the Dynamic Tower is designed to make one full rotation every 180 minutes. (Photo: Screenshot)

The design also lends itself to the short timeframe Fisher has allowed for its construction. Fisher said it could be completed by 2020 because the units will be prefabricated and then attached to the structure's concrete center. This would allow the entire building to be built quickly in factories and shipped to the construction site.

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