A woman waits for a train in the Minami-Aoyama railway station. Israeli transportation app Moovit released a worldwide report of commuter data this week. A woman waits for a train in the Minami-Aoyama railway station. Israeli transportation app Moovit released a worldwide report of commuter data this week. A woman waits for a train in a Tokyo railway station. (Photo: jointstar/Shutterstock)

Eye-opening facts about how we get to work every day

Where do you have to live to enjoy faster commutes? A new report by Moovit shows some fascinating trends in public transit.

How much time do you spend traveling to and from work each day?

It's a question you might not like asking yourself, especially if you live in cities with notoriously long commute times. But not to worry – Moovit, has done the asking for you. Founded by three Israeli entrepreneurs in 2011, Moovit is one of the world's most popular transportation apps. They just released their annual Global Transit Usage Report.

The Israel-based company company analyzed commuter data from its 50 million users to determine which cities enjoy the fastest wait times for buses and trains, how many transfers riders have to make, how much time they spend walking to and from stations, and how long they spend on their commutes each day.

The results, as you can see in these fun maps (because what analysis could be complete without fun maps?), could be promising or disappointing, depending on where you live.

Moovit's map shows the total time the average person waits at a station during his/her weekday commute.Moovit's map shows the total time the average person waits at a station during his/her weekday commute. (Photo: Moovit)

The percentage of people who transfer at least one time during their trip.The percentage of people who transfer at least one time during their trip. (Photo: Moovit)

The Moovit report was not meant to be a win-lose scenario, but there are some definite bright spots here. For example, the San Francisco Bay Area boasts the lowest average wait time for stops in the U.S., at just 13 minutes. It also claims that 52 percent of users there wait less than 10 minutes per day. Conclusion? If you live in the tech-savvy Bay Area, you probably spend much more time eating sushi and developing the next groundbreaking virtual reality platform than waiting for a ride.

On the other hand, there's ... everyone else. If you live in Philadelphia, you have the distinction of spending the most time on public transit in North America, at an average of 93 minutes per day. So if that isn't motivation enough for you to start carrying a book or two in your satchel, we don't know what is.

Average duration people spend commuting to and from work on a weekday.Average duration people spend commuting to and from work on a weekday. (Photo: Moovit)

Across the way in Los Angeles, you're likely to find yourself traveling the longest distance, with an average of 6.9 miles. (Those darn Hollywood Hills!) You're also branded with what Moovit calls the "terrible transfer title," meaning that 11 percent of riders have to take four or more transit lines to reach their destinations.

Average distance a person travels in a single trip on a weekday.Average distance a person travels in a single trip on a weekday. (Photo: Moovit)

And then there are the walkers. Some might find this surprising (we did), but the city with the the lowest percentage of people who walk half a mile or more each trip as part of their public transportation journey is ... New York! Conversely, the city with the longest walking distance is Philadelphia, the City of Brotherly Love and Transit Hell.

Percentage of commuters who walk more than half a mile each trip.Percentage of commuters who walk more than half a mile each trip. (Photo: Moovit)

"Our Public Transit Usage Report ... has revealed some fascinating insights about how we are traveling on local transit around the world," said Moovit Vice President of Products and Marketing Yovav Meydad, an alumnus of Ben Gurion University in Israel. "From the potential wait times between transfers to how long it takes for us to get to a stop, data extracted from the journeys of our users paint a colorful and hugely valuable picture of the infrastructure supporting the day-to-day commuting and traveling habits of residents and visitors."

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