Can you name this bird?

Beautiful birds Chestnut headed Bee eater perched on branch.(Merops leschenaulti)
Photo: BOONCHUAY PROMJIAM / Shutterstock

You've seen them soaring overhead, heard their calls and stood in awe of their beauty. But how well can you identify them?

Photo: BOONCHUAY PROMJIAM / Shutterstock
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Anna's Hummingbird in flight with purple flower
Photo: Keneva Photography / Shutterstock

Question 1 of 9 Score: 0

Name this fine feathered friend:

Found commonly along the Pacific Coast of the U.S., Anna's Hummingbirds have iridescent emerald feathers and sparkling rose-pink throats, leading some experts to describe them as "flying jewelry." They're also about the size of a ping-pong ball and no heavier than a nickel.

Photo: Keneva Photography / Shutterstock
Rose-ringed Parakeet in flight
Photo: Vladimir Kogan Michael / Shutterstock

Question 2 of 9 Score: 0

Name this vibrantly colored bird that's also a popular pet:

The Rose-ringed Parakeet (also known as the Ring-necked Parakeet) originated in West Africa and parts of Asia like India, Nepal and central Burma. This is a noisy species with an unmistakable squawking call and a distinctive green hue.

Photo: Vladimir Kogan Michael / Shutterstock
The hoopoe is Israel's national bird.
Photo: Georgios Alexandris / Shutterstock

Question 3 of 9 Score: 0

Which humorously named bird has the honor of being a national symbol?

The hoopoe was chosen as Israel's national symbol in 2008, winning over the bulbul, warbler and finch. It has a characteristic crown of feathers, a long, curved beak and is typically a sandy color with white and black stripes.

Photo: Georgios Alexandris / Shutterstock
tree kingfisher
Photo: Jack Guez / AFP/Getty Images

Question 4 of 9 Score: 0

Short tail, large head, long bill. Who's this little guy?

The tree kingfisher, widespread through Asia and Australia, is the most populous of the three families of birds in the kingfisher group. Most species dive onto prey from a perch, mainly taking slow-moving invertebrates or small vertebrates.

Photo: Jack Guez / AFP/Getty Images
Flamingos in the northern region of Eilat.

Question 5 of 9 Score: 0

Pretty in pink, pretty as a picture. Name them!

The water-loving flamingo is a favorite of zoo visitors, wildlife enthusiasts and serious bird watchers. Six species of this bird are scattered throughout the world, with the largest – the Greater Flamingo – found in parts of Africa, southern Asia and southern Europe.

Starling murmuration in Israel
Photo: Menahem Kahana/AFP/Getty Images

Question 6 of 9 Score: 0

What species of bird makes up this incredible formation, also called a murmuration?

Starlings flock to the evening skies in strange formations, moving fluidly as if they're a single organism. In this photo, they move mesmerizingly across the Israeli countryside.

Photo: Menahem Kahana/AFP/Getty Images
Common tern flying from water
Photo: Vladimir Kogan Michael / Shutterstock

Question 7 of 9 Score: 0

Name this bird, which some say resembles a small seagull:

Terns are seabirds found all over the world, and though they were once associated with gulls, they've since been given full family status of their own. They are slender, lightly built birds with long forked tails, narrow wings, long bills and relatively short legs. Their flight is buoyant and graceful.

Photo: Vladimir Kogan Michael / Shutterstock
Purple swamphen (Porphyrio porphyrio)
Photo: Ian White / Flickr

Question 8 of 9 Score: 0

What's this chicken-sized bird often found near water?

The Purple Swamphen is found throughout Asia, Africa, Australia and the surrounding islands of the South Pacific. Its standard red bill and frontal shield top off this bird's brilliant feather scheme of gorgeous blues and purples.

Photo: Ian White / Flickr
Cranes perform mating calls in Israel's Hula Valley.
Photo: Uzi Yachin / Flickr

Question 9 of 9 Score: 0

This migratory bird undergoes a lovely mating ritual involving an intriguing dance and a proud posture:

In fall and winter, a marshy area of Israel's Hula Valley is populated by thousands of mated pairs of cranes who take on a specific posture: heads thrown back, beaks skyward. These birds mate monogamously for life and raise their young together.

Photo: Uzi Yachin / Flickr