Can you ace this quiz about Israel’s natural wonders?

A geological formation belonging to the Jurassic period in Israek's Timna Valley.
Photo: Sergei25 / Shutterstock

Test your IQ of Israel's unique geological formations, postcard-ready coastlines and lush forests.

Photo: Sergei25 / Shutterstock
A family goes horse riding at a crater in the south of Israel.

Question 1 of 22 Score: 0

What is the name of the famous crater in southern Israel?

The 200 million-year-old Ramon Crater in southern Israel is a geological phenomenon. The crater – caused by erosion, not an asteroid — is the star structure of Israel's largest national park, the Ramon Nature Reserve. Nearly 25 miles long, more than 1,500 feet deep and as wide as six miles across, it attracts geologists, hikers and bikers from points near and far.

Matt Damon at the Toronto International Film Festival.
Photo: Wikimedia

Question 2 of 22 Score: 0

What's the connection between the Ramon Crater and Matt Damon?

The movie "The Martian" starred Matt Damon as an astronaut trying to survive on the Red Planet. In real life, a team of astronauts lived in a habitat in the Ramon Crater because it shares many similarities to the Martian environment in its geology, aridity and isolation, and was chosen to facilitate a simulated mission.

Photo: Wikimedia
A rare snowstorm in Jerusalem covers palm trees.
Photo: Copper Kettle / Flickr

Question 3 of 22 Score: 0

Does it ever snow in Israel?

While the average temperature in Jerusalem during winter is about 50 degrees, the subtropical, beach-heavy area of the Mediterranean does get a random light snow day about once a year. Israel-born snowmen usually melt within 24 hours.

Photo: Copper Kettle / Flickr
The Bahai Gardens are one of the most visited tourist attractions in Israel.
Photo: Hitman Sharon / Shutterstock

Question 4 of 22 Score: 0

Where are the Bahai Gardens?

The gardens extend almost a mile up Mount Carmel in Haifa, covering more than 2 million square feet of land. The gardens are linked by a set of stairs flanked by twin streams of running water cascading down the mountainside through the steps and terrace bridges. They are one of the many World Heritage Sites in Israel.

Photo: Hitman Sharon / Shutterstock
Grassy hills stretch as far as the eye can see.
Photo: Ben Haim / Shutterstock

Question 5 of 22 Score: 0

This mountain range is a UNESCO biosphere reserve.

Near the city of Haifa, the Mount Carmel Range is one of the most beautiful areas in Israel. Benefiting from its proximity to the Mediterranean Coast, the mountain's slopes are covered in plants and wildlife.

Photo: Ben Haim / Shutterstock
The surface of the Dead Sea reflects the soft blues of a pre-dawn sky.
Photo: Vblinov / Shutterstock

Question 6 of 22 Score: 0

Is the Dead Sea the lowest point on Earth?

The shores that surround the Dead Sea are about 1,400 feet below sea level, making this the lowest point on Earth that people can travel to and still be in the open air. Beneath its surface, the lake itself dips down over 1,000 feet, making it the deepest hypersaline lake in the world.

Photo: Vblinov / Shutterstock
People floating in the Dead Sea.
Photo: Valeriy Tretyakov / Shutterstock

Question 7 of 22 Score: 0

Is the Dead Sea actually a sea?

The Dead Sea is surprisingly not a sea at all. It's actually a salt lake. It has a single source, the Jordan River, and is not connected to the ocean. Its landlocked nature causes the water to evaporate and leave behind massive amounts of salt, making it so dense that people like the Backstreet Boys can float on top of it.

Photo: Valeriy Tretyakov / Shutterstock
The lake is fed partly by underground springs, although its main source is the Jordan River.
Photo: Wikimedia

Question 8 of 22 Score: 0

What is the second-lowest lake in the world after the Dead Sea?

The Sea of Galilee – also known as Lake Tiberias or the Kineret – is the lowest freshwater lake on Earth and the second-lowest lake in the world (after the Dead Sea, a saltwater lake). It is around 700 feet below sea level.

Photo: Wikimedia
A view of the cliffs at Mr. Arbel National Park in the northern section of the Israel National Trail.
Photo: Steve Lagreca / Shutterstock

Question 9 of 22 Score: 0

The Israel National Trail goes through...

The more than 600 miles of trail crosses the entire country of Israel from north to south. It has been listed in National Geographic's 20 most "epic trails," and was hiked by famed behavioral economist Dan Ariely for his 50th birthday.

Photo: Steve Lagreca / Shutterstock
Narrow canyons and sandstone cliffs dot the landscape around the marina.
Photo: Sergei25 / Shutterstock

Question 10 of 22 Score: 0

What is Israel's southernmost city?

Eilat is Israel's southernmost city located at the northern tip of the Red Sea. It has a population of more than 50,000, but swells beyond that with an influx of tourists as a popular resort destination. Why is that? Well, there's an average of 360 sunny days a year there. That's why.

Photo: Sergei25 / Shutterstock
The Malham Salt Cave (pictured here) is the longest salt cave in the world.
Photo: Anton Chikishev / Hebrew University

Question 11 of 22 Score: 0

What is the name of the world's longest salt cave?

In 2019, an international expedition of 80 cave experts from nine countries successfully mapped the Malham Salt Cave near the Dead Sea in Israel. At 10 kilometers (6.2 miles), it now bears the title of the world's longest salt cave. The previous record holder was the Cave of the Three Nudes in Iran.

Photo: Anton Chikishev / Hebrew University
Mount Herman also offers both sledding and Nordic skiing.
Photo: Maratr / Shutterstock

Question 12 of 22 Score: 0

This mountain is home to a ski resort.

The ski resort at Mount Hermon in northern Israel has a top elevation of 6,690 feet and nearly 28 miles of ski runs. During the winter, the slopes are used for skiing and snowboarding with a wide variety of trails for beginners and advanced skiers.

Photo: Maratr / Shutterstock
A view of the Mediterranean Sea from the Israeli city of Ashkelon.
Photo: Saikom / Shutterstock

Question 13 of 22 Score: 0

Which of these countries border the Mediterranean Sea?

The countries surrounding the Mediterranean in clockwise order are Spain, France, Monaco, Italy, Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Albania, Greece, Turkey, Syria, Lebanon, Israel, Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria, and Morocco; Malta and Cyprus are island countries in the sea.

Photo: Saikom / Shutterstock
The Israeli city by the Mediterranean features a stunning array of tree species from around the world.
Photo: Valentine Svensson / Flickr

Question 14 of 22 Score: 0

Which Israeli city has the highest tree density?

You normally don't picture the bustling urban metropolis of Tel Aviv as particularly green, but it's currently home to more than 260,000 trees covering 20 square miles and, according to Treepedia, is ranked in the top 20 of global cities flush with foliage.

Photo: Valentine Svensson / Flickr
Cranes mingle on a misty morning in Hula Valley.
Photo: Yuval Shoshan / Flickr

Question 15 of 22 Score: 0

What is the name of the famous locale where birds migrate each year?

Tens of thousands of birds use the Hula Valley as a stopover point during their annual migration from Europe to Africa and back again. It has become a tourist attraction for birdwatchers and nature photographers from across the globe.

Photo: Yuval Shoshan / Flickr
Coral reefs in some parts of the Red Sea are surviving despite decades of climate change-related damage.
Photo: Valentyn Volkov / Shutterstock

Question 16 of 22 Score: 0

Coral reefs are struggling nearly everywhere except...

Corals at the northernmost tip of the Red Sea are exhibiting remarkable resistance to rising water temperatures and acidification, according to researchers in Eilat. Experts hope the lessons learned in the Red Sea can help coral reefs elsewhere in the world.

Photo: Valentyn Volkov / Shutterstock
The ancient cave has been the focus of paleoclimate research.
Photo: Mordechai Meiri / Shutterstock

Question 17 of 22 Score: 0

Where is the Avshalom Cave located?

Hidden within the Judean Hills, the Avshalom Cave stretches over 50,000 square feet. The massive, 300,000-year-old stalactites and stalagmites of this cave make it one of Israel's must-see natural phenomena. And there's a reason for that psychedelic lighting: it controls the growth of algae within the ancient cave.

Photo: Mordechai Meiri / Shutterstock
The beaches in Tel Aviv are popular places to hang out.
Photo: RnDmS / Shutterstock

Question 18 of 22 Score: 0

How many miles of beaches does Tel Aviv have?

Tel Aviv's beaches lie on 13 miles of Mediterranean seashore. It's great for surfing, paddle boarding and enjoying serene sunsets. You might even see people play "matkot," a combination of squash and beach volleyball.

Photo: RnDmS / Shutterstock
Only a thin fence separates them from a colossal, orange rock structure that looks like it's somehow pulsing with fire.
Photo: Protasov AN / Shutterstock

Question 19 of 22 Score: 0

What is this popular rappelling destination called?

The Rainbow Cave – a colossal, orange rock structure – is a large natural arch with a shallow cave beneath it. Tourists flock there to rappel and hike in the area.

Photo: Protasov AN / Shutterstock
Visitors can hike above or within the canyon on relatively short trails that leave a lasting impression.
Photo: Ben Haim / Shutterstock

Question 20 of 22 Score: 0

What is this canyon called?

Transformed by water over thousands of years, the 100-foot-long sandstone Red Canyon in southern Israel offers amazing views and a look into the past.

Photo: Ben Haim / Shutterstock
The iconic white facade of Rosh Hanikra is majestic to see from afar, but even more fascinating up close.
Photo: AN / Shutterstock

Question 21 of 22 Score: 0

These grottoes are located in...

A popular tourist attraction in northern Israel, the Rosh Hanikra grottoes are a geological formation where white chalk cliffs meet bright blue water.

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A video of Eli Fruchter swimming in his home aquarium went viral in 2015.
Photo: Courtesy

Question 22 of 22 Score: 0

A Haifa homeowner built an aquarium in his living room that was...

Eli Fruchter filled his 10,000 gallon aquarium with 150 fish of 30 different species. It is believed to be one of the largest home aquariums in the world and is so big that Fruchter can actually scuba dive inside of it.

Photo: Courtesy
A geological formation belonging to the Jurassic period in Israek's Timna Valley.
Photo: Sergei25 / Shutterstock
Photo: Sergei25 / Shutterstock