Do you know your neighborhoods?

Portobello Road is home to one of London's most notable street markets.
Photo: QQ7 / Shutterstock.com

From Tokyo to Tel Aviv, test your knowledge of the world's most iconic 'hoods.

Photo: QQ7 / Shutterstock.com
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The Shibuya crossing is considered the busiest crossing in the world.
Photo: e X p o s e / Shutterstock.com

Question 1 of 8 Score: 0

This Tokyo neighborhood is thought to have the world's busiest crosswalk:

One of Tokyo's shopping and nightlife centers, Shibuya is probably best known for Shibuya crossing, a Times Square-like intersection of bright lights and people.

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Café de Flore
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Question 2 of 8 Score: 0

The Café de Flore and Les Deux Magots are just two of the landmarks in this Parisian arrondissement:

Paris is home to many well-known neighborhoods, but this one, on the city's Left Bank, is among its most revered. Once the stomping grounds of the city's intellectual elite, it remains a cultural center.

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Street art in Florentin.
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Question 3 of 8 Score: 0

This neighborhood in Tel Aviv, Israel has developed a reputation for its street art:

Often compared to New York's Lower East Side, Florentin has developed a reputation for attracting those with an artistic bent. The creative culture of the neighborhood can be witnessed in the street art, which adorns much of the public space here.

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Portobello Road is home to one of London's most notable street markets.
Photo: QQ7 / Shutterstock.com

Question 4 of 8 Score: 0

Known for its famous Portobello Road, this London neighborhood was the title of a 1999 film starring Hugh Grant and Julia Roberts:

Home to the Portobello market, one of London's best-known markets, the neighborhood has long been celebrated for its cultural offerings such as the Notting Hill Carnival.

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La Boca
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Question 5 of 8 Score: 0

Situated at the mouth of the river Riachuelo, this neighborhood is the original settlement of what is now Argentina's capital, Buenos Aires:

La Boca is the old working-class neighborhood of Buenos Aires famed for its tango, its football club Boca Juniors, and its colorful homes.

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Greenwich Village.
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Question 6 of 8 Score: 0

The likes of Bob Dylan and Dylan Thomas used to haunt this section of Manhattan:

Arguably the birthplace of American counterculture, Greenwich Village today attracts a more affluent demographic, though it still retains a certain bohemian charm.

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Piazza Santa Maria.
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Question 7 of 8 Score: 0

This Roman neighborhood's name is translated to English as "beyond the Tiber":

Trastevere is one of Rome's most popular neighborhoods, its labyrinthine streets designed purposefully to confuse invading armies. Today it's home to a more peaceful setting, its many restaurants and bars crowded year round.

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South Beach, Miami is known for its many clubs and Art Deco buildings.
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Question 8 of 8 Score: 0

This Miami neighborhood is known for its Art Deco buildings and nightlife:

One of the first sections of Miami Beach to be developed, South Beach remains an integral part of the city's culture with its many restaurants, nightclubs, hotels and shops.

Photo: S.Borisov / Shutterstock.com
Portobello Road is home to one of London's most notable street markets.
Photo: QQ7 / Shutterstock.com
Photo: QQ7 / Shutterstock.com