How well do you know the 'Star Trek' universe?

The USS Enterprise from "Star Trek."
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From special guest stars to nefarious villains, test your 'Star Trek' knowledge with this quiz.

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The famous 'Star Trek' insignia.
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Question 1 of 10 Score: 0

This genius, whose official archives reside in Israel, has appeared several times on 'Star Trek':

Despite his death a decade before the first episode of "Star Trek" aired, Einstein was featured on the series several times. His most memorable cameo was a 1993 episode that also featured Sir Isaac Newton and the real Stephen Hawking.

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The colors of the uniforms on the original 'Star Trek' series indicated different levels of command and responsibility.
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Question 2 of 10 Score: 0

What 'Star Trek' uniform color often meant certain death for the owner?

The term "red-shirting" has become "Star Trek" slang for a supporting character who often will not make it through a single episode of the original series. These scarlet uniforms generally belonged to those working in security or engineering aboard the Enterprise.

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Worf, played by American actor Michael Dorn, was the first main Klingon character to appear in the "Star Trek" franchise.
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Question 3 of 10 Score: 0

The Klingon language was first used in this 'Star Trek' film:

Despite containing only 3,000 words, Klingon is one of the few fictional languages that has made the jump from fiction to reality. In 2015, an Israeli tech startup advertised 100 openings in Klingon to attract new creative talent.

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The character Spock, played by Leonard Nimoy, was originally supposed to have much more colorful skin.
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Question 4 of 10 Score: 0

Spock's yellowish skin was originally supposed to be this color:

"Star Trek" creator Gene Roddenberry originally wanted Spock's skin color to be red. He abandoned this idea after realizing the effect wouldn't come across on black and white TV and that American actor Leonard Nimoy would have to endure hours in makeup.

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A Romulan Warbird from "Star Trek: The Next Generation."
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Question 5 of 10 Score: 0

What are Romulan ships powered by?

Romulan Warbirds, which are nearly twice the size of the Enterprise, are powered by artificial quantum singularities or black holes.

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The Vulcans have a preference for a diet that does no harm to living creatures.
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Question 6 of 10 Score: 0

Most Vulcans embrace this kind of diet:

While Spock likely wouldn't look down upon the healthy eating tenants of the Mediterranean diet, his focus was mainly on vegetarian meals. According to Vulcan cultural norms, the first rule is to "ideally, do not harm...As far as possible, do not kill."

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An image from the 2009 "Star Trek" showing a young James T. Kirk watching a starship under construction.
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Question 7 of 10 Score: 0

This actor became only the second to play Captain Kirk:

Despite what he described as an "awful" first audition, American actor Chris Pine eventually scored the role of Captain Kirk in the 2009 "Star Trek" reboot. The rising star will next be seen opposite Israeli actress Gal Gadot in DC Comics' "Wonder Woman."

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Captain James T. Kirk as played by American actor William Shatner in the original "Star Trek" television series.
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Question 8 of 10 Score: 0

What does the middle initial of Captain James T. Kirk stand for?

As referenced in JJ Abrams' 2009 "Star Trek" reboot, Captain James Tiberius Kirk received his middle name in homage to his grandfather.

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The gigantic, ever-evolving cube spacecraft of the alien species The Borg.
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Question 9 of 10 Score: 0

"Resistance is futile" is the mantra of this alien race:

The Borg, a collection of species that have been turned into networked cybernetic organisms, rank as one of the most vicious "Star Trek" villains of all time.

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Israeli actor Brian George is seen here as the Jedi Ki-Adi-Mundi in the "Star Wars" prequels.
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Question 10 of 10 Score: 0

This Israeli actor has appeared not only in "Star Trek" but also in "Star Wars":

Israeli actor Brian George appeared on Star Trek series "Voyager" and "Deep Space Nine." He also had a recurring role as the Jedi Ki-Adi-Mundi in the "Star Wars" prequels. You've likely also spied him as Babu Bhatt on "Seinfeld" and Raj's father on "The Big Bang Theory."

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