Can you name these 9 musical instruments from around the world?

Collage of musical instruments around the world.
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See if you can identify the creative tools people across the globe have been using to make music for centuries.

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Ukulele, traditional small guitar-like instrument that originated in Hawaii.
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Question 1 of 9 Score: 0

Name this small guitar-like instrument:

Originating in 19th-century Hawaii, the ukulele is commonly associated with music and culture from the island state. They're usually made of wood or plastic.

How does it sound? Watch the video

Photo: SpeedKingz / Shutterstock
Australian didgeridoo
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Question 2 of 9 Score: 0

Name this long, skinny instrument with a unique sound:

This wind instrument developed by indigenous Australians is still in widespread use today. It's usually made of hardwood, especially from the various eucalyptus species that are native to the region.

How does it sound? Watch the video

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Zither, traditional string instrument.
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Question 3 of 9 Score: 0

Name this term for both a class of string instrument and a particular instrument within that class:

The zither's exact origin and age are unknown, but the word "zither" is a German rendering of the Latin "cithara," from which the word "guitar" is also derived.

How does it sound? Watch the video

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timbrel
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Question 4 of 9 Score: 0

Name this percussion instrument that's considered a precursor to the tambourine:

One of the oldest percussion instruments in existence, the timbrel was played in Israel and Egypt to accompany joyful dancing.

How does it sound? Watch the video

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Sitar, a string Traditional Indian musical instrument.
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Question 5 of 9 Score: 0

Name this string instrument that enjoyed a Beatlemania-fueled revival:

The sitar has always flourished in India, but it became world famous when the Beatles fell in love with Eastern music and incorporated the sitar's sound into songs like "Norwegian Wood" and "Love You To."

How does it sound? Watch the video

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Mbira, a traditional African musical instrument.
Photo: Wikimedia Commons

Question 6 of 9 Score: 0

Name this traditional wooden and metal instrument:

The mbira is an African instrument made of a wooden board and attached metal tines. It's played by plucking the tines with the thumbs, which is why it's often called a "thumb piano."

How does it sound? Watch the video

Photo: Wikimedia Commons
Latin percussion instrument called a cabasa.
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Question 7 of 9 Score: 0

Name this handheld percussion instrument:

The cabasa, which produces a metallic, rattling sound when shaken, has African origins but was reimagined with a metal lining in the mid-20th century. It's now popular in Latin music.

How does it sound? Watch the video

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Mandolin is a string instrument that originated in Italy and is still popular today.
Photo: Vereshchagin Dmitry / Shutterstock

Question 8 of 9 Score: 0

Name this instrument that's in the lute family:

The metal-stringed mandolin we know today can be traced to Italy in the 17th and 18th centuries. Its variations are numerous, but the most common one has eight metal strings and a round, wooden body.

How does it sound? Watch the video

Photo: Vereshchagin Dmitry / Shutterstock
The pan flute is a woodwind instrument that goes back thousands of years.
Photo: jorge pereira / Shutterstock

Question 9 of 9 Score: 0

Name this instrument that predates both the pipe organ and the harmonica:

The pan flute is typically made from bamboo or cane. Its exact age and origin are unknown, but there are clues alluding to the instrument in ancient Rome.

How does it sound? Watch the video

Photo: jorge pereira / Shutterstock
Collage of musical instruments around the world.
Photo: Shutterstock
Photo: Shutterstock