Episode 17: Daniella Rudoff, professional matchmaker and relationship coach

An expert on finding the perfect mate, staying in a healthy relationship and which pitfalls to avoid.

The guest: Daniella Rudoff is a professional matchmaker and relationship coach based in Israel. In a world full of online dating apps, she offers a boutique service. She's worked with hundreds of singles with a singular goal in mind: helping them find that one needle in a haystack.

The gist: When you think of matchmaking, you're likely taken back to an old world society – centuries before the invention of dating apps. But we've entered a new era of matchmaking. In a time when so many people are meeting through swiping right on an app, many are looking for more authentic connections. So they're turning to that tried and true gold standard – the matchmaker. The dating industry is estimated to be worth more than $1 billion in the U.S. Personal matchmaking services account for about $500 million of that according to the Matchmaking Institute in New York City. That same group estimates that there are now more than 2,000 professional matchmakers in the U.S. and thousands more worldwide. There's even a matchmaking reality show. So what goes into the job of being a matchmaker? How successful at making matches are they? And are there tips they can offer to help those singles still searching for that perfect mate? In this week's episode, we pull back the curtain on the business of matchmaking with Daniella Rudoff.

Further reading:

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Daniella and her husband Josh live in Beit Shemesh, a city halfway between Jerusalem and Tel Aviv. Daniella and her husband Josh live in Beit Shemesh, a city halfway between Jerusalem and Tel Aviv. (Photo: Courtesy)

Transcript

Benyamin: On this episode of Our Friend From Israel...

Daniella: The date looks nothing like their profile picture. Happens all the time, I would imagine.

Benyamin: It happens sometimes or maybe they embellish their bio a little bit. Now you're over it with all those apps out there, well matchmaking making a comeback.

Benyamin: When you think of matchmaking, you're likely taken back to old world society. Centuries before the invention of dating apps. But we've entered a new era of matchmaking. In a time when so many people are meeting through swiping right on an app, many are looking for more authentic connections so they're turning to that tried and true gold standard, the matchmaker.

Benyamin: The dating industry is estimated to be worth more than one billion dollars in the U.S. Personal matchmaking services account for about 500 million of that according to the Matchmaking Institute in New York City. That same group estimates that there are now more than 2,000 professional matchmakers in the U.S. and thousands more worldwide. There's even a matchmaking reality show.

Speaker 3: Tonight on Million Dollar Matchmaker.

Speaker 4: You're killing me. Two attorneys this week.

Speaker 5: Sorry.

Rhonda Wheels: Rhonda Wheels. I was on the show Sisters In Law.

Speaker 7: She looks at love like business.

Rhonda Wheels: Patty thinks I'm setting the bar too high.

Speaker 8: Yeah. I'm going to be me.

Benyamin: So what goes into the job of being a matchmaker? How successful at making matches are they? And are there tips they can offer to help those singles still searching for that perfect mate? In this week's episode, we pull back the curtain on the business of matchmaking with Daniella Rudoff.

Benyamin: In a world full of online dating apps, she offers a boutique service. She's worked with hundreds of singles with a singular goal in mind, helping them find that one needle in a haystack. Stay tuned.

Benyamin: Welcome to Our Friend From Israel. A podcast brought to you by FromTheGrapevine.com. I'm your host, Benyamin Cohen. And each week we'll have a conversation with an intriguing Israeli. They'll come from all walks of life. Actors, artists, athletes, academics, archaeologists and other news makers.

Benyamin: On today's show, we chat with Daniella Rudoff. A professional matchmaker based in Israel.

Daniella: Yeah. Exactly. How have you been all these years?

Benyamin: I know. It's been a long time.

Daniella: Yeah.

Benyamin: Doing well. Doing well. Hello everybody and welcome to today's show. We are joined by matchmaker, Daniella Rudoff from her home in Beit Shemesh. Hello.

Daniella: Hey Benyamin. How you doing?

Benyamin: Good. How are you?

Daniella: Hello everybody.

Benyamin: Thank you so much for joining us today. We greatly appreciate it.

Daniella: My pleasure. My pleasure.

Benyamin: So I guess we should get something out of the way just so our listeners know. You and I actually know each other. You didn't set me up on any dates, even though I could have used your help. But you and I actually grew up together. Our moms were best friends.

Daniella: Yes. I remember those good old days.

Benyamin: Yes. So you knew me way back when.

Daniella: Yes. And good friends with your siblings too.

Benyamin: So matchmaking is kind of a ... It's not the typical job that someone has. How did you get involved in matchmaking?

Daniella: Great question Benyamin. I didn't really start it myself, rather people started asking me to set them up and it just turned into something really big. And so I think it started primarily because I'm a teacher and then when we moved to Israel, I became a marriage educator and called that marriage architect and created a website, marriagearchitect.com and I teach communication skills and relationship building skills to couples, to make sure that that happy dating couple continues to be an amazingly happy married couple.

Daniella: So the name marriage architect might have been interpreted by others as a person who sets people up. So it's not something that I predicted in my life, but it is certainly a major part of my life right now.

Benyamin: So basically you're doing two things then, you're setting people up and then on the flip side, you're also helping them stay happily married.

Daniella: Yeah. It's really integral to what I do. I really actually ... I'm in touch with the couples as they date and because I meet with each person before I set them up, I've developed a relationship with each of them. It's really really nice, where I'm making sure that they both have the same goal, that they both see this as a longer term relationship. It's really nice because if they're both not in it for the same reasons then I tell them, "You know what, maybe this is not a good idea to continue."

Daniella: So nobody is wasting their time in a relationship that is not a healthy relationship for them. And I think that's one of the big issues that goes on today, is that people waste a lot of time dating people that is not really going to be for a long term relationship.

Benyamin: Right. And I think a lot of times people stay in relationship just because there's almost like a stasis that they don't want to ... People don't break up just because it's easier sometimes just to stay together and stay with the status quo. And sometimes I would imagine having a middle person, a matchmaker in the middle may be easier to tell that person, "Hey, I want to end this relationship." Is that true?

Daniella: Absolutely. And another aspect is that people who come to me to meet with me and gets set up and for dating mentoring, they want that. They want somebody who's going to be there in the middle, who is going to make sure that this is a healthy relationship and if it's not, to end it. It's exactly what you're saying and it's true. I do see that.

Benyamin: Yeah. So do you have like ... Is there like a, I'm gonna say "date-a-base." Do you have some sort of database with all of your clientele or do you have like an old fashioned system with file cards? How does it work?

Daniella: Oh, it's definitely not the old fashioned system. It is a computerized database that I have. A lot of it is in my mind because I meet each person. And I know you're a people person as well so you know what it's like, you meet a person and you really fully have a discussion with them. You know a lot about them and you have a new friend in your life.

Benyamin: So do people just ... Do you do it by phone? Do they come? Is this like an in person face to face? What's the kind of the nitty gritty of how it works?

Daniella: Okay. So really people contact me from all over the world. So if they live in Israel or they're visiting Israel, then they come to meet with me where I live in Beit Shemesh.

Benyamin: Which is halfway between Jerusalem and Tel Aviv.

Daniella: Yes.

Benyamin: In case people didn't know.

Daniella: Yeah. So people come to meet with me here. And if they live outside of Israel then I set up a Skype or Google Hangout video chat and we have a meeting face to face. And my seventh couple actually happened that way, through a video, my meeting them on video call. So that's pretty cool. It did work.

Benyamin: And then after a date, are you getting phone calls from each party telling you what happened on the date?

Daniella: Yes. So what I found works in my life best so that I can help manage hundreds of people in my life. Let's say my couples, I have a couple dating seriously now. So I set up you know like once a week, twice a week a call just to make sure that things are ... That they sound great and giving dating tips to them to make sure that the relationship is developing properly and to take it from dating to a dating relationship. And I think that's imperative because a lot of people just can keep dating, but they don't know how to take it to the next level.

Daniella: And so that's really important when you want to ... You know I set people up who want to get married. So I think that that's part of this and it's learning how to do that. And they loved the tips. It's great. But to answer your question, it's mostly done by email afterwards or WhatsApps. When I have an idea, right before our call right now, I just made a suggestion. I sent an email suggestion to somebody, the guy already said yes and now I just ask the woman if she wants to go out. And another person sent me another set up I was about to do. So I said, "Can you please send me your phone number and what time you he can call you." And that's how that setup is going. And these are two different things I'm working on right now, besides the couple that's dating seriously. And then there are many others that I'm trying to work on. So it's busy.

Benyamin: Yeah. Sounds like it. So you mentioned earlier that you've set up your seventh couple. How long have you been a matchmaker?

Daniella: Okay. So first of all, I set up eight couples who have gotten married. There are six babies in the world and three on the way. One of them is actually overdue right now so she might have actually have the baby as we speak. It's very exciting. This whole thing developed in my life in 2012 over nine months and just got a 100 people came to meet with me and then I realized, let me either go get a day job or make this my job.

Benyamin: And how many people have come to you over the years?

Daniella: Hundreds.

Benyamin: I'm coming in from the outside here. Eight out of hundreds sounds like a very low number, but it's almost like, I don't know if you follow sports, but like a baseball player who gets three hits for every 10 at bats is considered a superstar. You know?

Daniella: I like that.

Benyamin: So what's considered a good success rate for a matchmaker?

Daniella: I don't know. I've heard a lot of comments from different people. I've heard that this is pretty awesome. It is really awesome and it's ... You know I need to hear that encouragement to continue. So it's good. It is pretty awesome. It's a needle in a haystack. It's not easy. You're finding the one hopefully for that person, for their life so it's ... You know their match for their life, their soul mate. And if you consider it, there are billions of people in the world, that's pretty good.

Benyamin: Right. I've set up one couple and they got married but they also got divorced. I don't know if that counts.

Daniella: I don't know. I don't know how these things come out.

Benyamin: When we return, Daniella gives advice on taking the perfect dating profile photo. Plus the one mistake people make in their pictures.

Daniella: Please, please, please send a picture, just you in the picture. If you're sending a picture of you and your best friend and I make a suggestion to a guy or girl then they might say, "I want to go out with the other one. I want to go with her or I want to go out with him." And then I'm like, "Ah."

Benyamin: All that and much more after the break.

Benyamin: If you're enjoying this interview, you'll also want to check out our recent episode with Sarah Berkowitz. She's a home cook, who has produced more than 400 recipes for our website.

Sarah Berkowitz: You know, I had an interest in psychology since I was very little. And you know I love the idea of nurturing people and helping them fix their problems. And I've really discovered that food has a way of doing that. The act of eating and cooking for someone is very intimate. And I find that it creates a strong bond. It's the kind of gift, when you give someone home made food or when you cook a meal for someone, it really strengthens your bond. It's more than just food.

Benyamin: Check out that previous episode at OurFriendFromIsrael.com. And while you're there, sign up for our Israeli Kitchen newsletter to receive Sarah's recipes directly in your email. And now, back to today's interview with matchmaker, Daniella Rudoff.

Benyamin: So I wanted to shift topics a little bit and talk about relationships and dating in general and obviously more and more people are meeting online nowadays. You really don't hear much about matchmaking these days. People are going on apps and Tinder, whatever apps on their phone and just meeting people, but why do you think people are, even in a technological age, still going to a matchmaker?

Daniella: Okay. So I get all the people who are tired of the dating sites and they want somebody who really wants to get to know them well. What does work well is along the lines of what we were speaking about is it's kind of like a boutique service. I'm here to meet the person individually. I'm their best advocate when I want to make a suggestion to somebody on their behalf. I'm the one who make sure that they're presented well and I meet the person usually in-person or on Skype or video chat. So let's say their picture doesn't match how nice they look in person then I try to work with them and make sure that that looks nice or I always like to be a straight shooter. I don't like to make things up. Even if somebody asks me about age, I try to just say as it is.

Benyamin: You don't sugarcoat it and say, if someone's heavyset, you don't say they're athletic build or something?

Daniella: No. I really don't. And I send a picture just like I work with anybody else and people make their decisions. Another aspect of being very open is that the first date would be a positive date because they both agreed to go out with that person. You know what I'm saying? Like it's just a nice way of doing ... I feel more relieved when I've set everything the right way because there are no surprises later. And the other aspect is that they benefit from my making sure that they're happy couple as they're dating, from date one to date two, date two to date three. Obviously within what they appreciate in their personality. I can tell when a person wants more hand-holding and when somebody wants less. But it's to their benefit as we discussed before, that I'm making sure that they both are happy to go out again. That they both want to progress in this relationship. And I think that's really important so that they're not wasting their time.

Benyamin: I assume you have situations where one person is saying, "I had a great time." And the other person's like, "Can you please tell them I'm not interested."

Daniella: Yes. I've had that a few times. Yes. And it breaks my heart for the person who had a really great time.

Benyamin: You know, in a dating app there's just thousands, tens of thousands, millions of people on there. The buffet is so large. I think it may hinder people because it's like the grass is always greener. So it's like you just keep swiping and looking and clicking and it almost creates the situation where they're never going to find the right person even though ironically, there so many people on this dating app.

Daniella: Exactly.

Benyamin: So having a matchmaker like yourself is probably ... It might be a better way for them to find somebody.

Daniella: Right. I think there are many benefits to it.

Benyamin: So you were talking about having a good picture to send to the other party. I know some people, there's always that classic story of somebody posting a picture on a dating site or something or sending another person a picture that's like 15 or 20 years old, when you were younger.

Daniella: Right. Exactly.

Benyamin: You weight less or you look better. You didn't have a receding hairline. I mean what are some tips that you give people to take a good photograph?

Daniella: Okay. So those are two separate topics. It's the-

Benyamin: Okay.

Daniella: [crosstalk 00:16:03] give you updated photo that looks good and some tips of how to give a good photo, right? So I had a tip to taking a good photo. So-

Benyamin: We'll take both way.

Daniella: Yeah. So first of all, I just met the person. So if I feel that they need an updated photo, I will ask them for a few updated photos so that I can choose what I like best. I don't like to insult people so if they send me 10 photos, I'm happy because then I could choose what I like this or sometimes I send all 10 to the person because they look awesome. It's a great photo shoot, but it's not even a photo shoot, it's more like just different photos from different points that they have on their phone.

Daniella: Some people get a photo shoot done. You know professional photographer and somehow make it look natural like they're not getting a photo shoot done. I think that's the best. I think that that's one way of doing it. Another thing is the phones today are pretty good. The cameras are really good on some of these phones. If they have somebody else take 20 pictures outside in good lighting then I think that they can come out with one or two good pictures. I don't like to make such a big deal about pictures and the way it sounds materialistically, but as you mentioned, on these dating sites and what's out there today, it's a key to a date. So whether or not we like it that it's physical, materialistic, whatever but I like to say dating and marriage, marriage is the one relationship that it actually matters. So I get it. I understand it. And we just have to go with the flow. So we have to embrace it. And just make sure it's a great photo.

Daniella: And it's interesting because it doesn't always have to be that picture at a wedding, when you don't quite look like yourself. If some people [inaudible 00:18:02] and their hair look ... Let's say if it's a woman, her hair is up or the guy is in this tux and he doesn't usually wear tux. Just send three different pictures. One, where they're just like you know they're going to a wedding. One, when they're casual looking nice. One on a hike. That's cool also. And it just shows various ways that they would look different times and one might be more attractive.

Daniella: One time there was a guy looking at a few pictures that I showed him and actually he's like, "I like that one the best." Where she looks plain and simple on a hike and he just thought that was so attractive. So it was eye-opening for me and I like to suggest that. But I would suggest to also send a picture where your dressed nicely in addition to the one on a hike.

Daniella: And then another great suggestion is please, please, please send a picture, just you in the picture. If you're sending a picture of you and your best friend and I make a suggestion to a guy or a girl, then they might say, "I want to go out with the other one. I want to go out with her or I want to go out with him." And then I'm like, "Ah."

Benyamin: You don't want to compare yourself. You don't want to be compared to somebody.

Daniella: Absolutely. And also, that's also a suggestion for your Facebook profile picture. I don't know why people put two people in their profile picture. Maybe on their timeline, okay I get it. But if you're really serious about getting married, I don't know if I would do that. It's really taking a risk.

Benyamin: What other mistakes do people make on their dating profiles? You talked about the picture choice. Is there anything else that you could think of?

Daniella: Yes. So it's nice that I can tell you that I don't really look at dating profiles so much. I really depend a lot on my meetings with people and I like that and I value it a lot. Will it always be like that? Who knows? But at this point, that's the way it is. I feel that everyone, when I do look at a dating profile, it almost sounds like the last dating profile I looked at. A lot of people sound very similar, but I like to hear their personality. I want to hear you know have a conversation, get to know them and it's just so much more pleasant. And I certainly remember them so much more and better. So I think it's to their benefit to have a conversation with somebody.

Benyamin: Hello listeners, you'll notice that every single podcast on the planet ask you to rate and review them on iTunes, why is that? Well, here's the answer. The more reviews and ratings that the show gets, the higher the show winds up on the iTunes charts, which in turn helps more people find the show. So if you're enjoying this podcast, please head on over to iTunes and leave us a rating and a review. It's greatly appreciated.

Benyamin: If you're enjoying this episode, you might also want to listen to our interview with Professor Tal Ben-Shahar. His class on Positive Psychology was the most popular course in the history of Harvard.

Tal Ben-Shahar: You know my favorite word in English is the word, "appreciate." I love that word. And if you think about it, it has two meanings. And the two meanings of the word "appreciate" are intimately connected. Why? Because when you appreciate the good, the good appreciates.

Benyamin: Check out that interview and our entire archive of episodes at OurFriendFromIsrael.com. And now, back to today's interview with matchmaker, Daniella Rudoff.

Benyamin: You mentioned that your clients are dating with the purpose of getting married. So what do you tell them when they're you know it's just like you said, a lifelong decision. How does someone know if it's the right one, if it's the one that they should marry?

Daniella: That's a great question, Benyamin. Okay so I don't have that official discussion with them when they're dating. It's more that I'm listening to them and what I want to be hearing as they're dating is, "Wow Daniella, thank you so much for setting me up with this person. I can't tell you how happy I am." Or whatever it is along those lines. It doesn't have to be immediate. For many many times, it is immediate for one partner and the other one was like, "Well, thank you so much." You know they take it at a slower pace and it takes them more time, but they definitely are saying things like they're happy that they're dating this person because I ask and not just waiting to listen. Sometimes I'm asking questions along these lines. What I want to be hearing is that they're happy to go on the next date. I'm not asking necessarily, "Do you want to marry this person?" That would be so overwhelming for people. Unless they tell me that, but ...

Benyamin: Did you ever tell them to slow down a second, if they're jumping too fast?

Daniella: Interesting question. There was a couple who went out every single day. And I just felt like they were going too fast for their type. You know there are different types, different cultures that go out faster and more often. But for their culture, I felt like it was a lot, but you know they are two adults. You know what I'm saying? But I noticed that it wasn't going to go anywhere. It was too much too fast for their type. And it didn't go anywhere. But I'm really listening to them to make sure that they're happy and in terms of, do they know? Often times, a guy will be like, "Oh my gosh. Thank you so much for ... I'm so ... She's exactly what I'm looking for." And I'm like, "Yey!" Before I get too excited, I want to hear what she has to say. And if I hear a smile in the email, if that makes sense, then I just gently encourage. And if I know from both sides that it's going well, that's the concept.

Daniella: You don't necessarily go out and say, "Do you want to marry this person?" Until they're ready to discuss that. And then of course it's done gently and I think that that's the key. Pressuring people is just not the way to go in my opinion. And making sure they're happy is the way to go, in my opinion and giving skills to take it from dating to that dating relationship, that's what I call it, which is the you know, I call that two different stages in a relationship. It doesn't mean from date one to date two, it means the first couple of dates or the first many dates where you see that they really like each other, they want to continue going out from date to date. And then at some point, you need to make this more of a what I call a dating relationship, where you develop a new concept that this is our new relationship with each other. That makes it more serious than any other person that you know in your life and the different relationships in your life.

Daniella: And then of course, both sides are thinking that they like this person enough that they might want to marry them. But otherwise, they wouldn't have continue, if they're dating for marriage. And then taking it from those different stages will gradually, in a healthy way bring it towards the engagement. And then there's that whole engagement period. And then of course, the wedding and marriage.

Daniella: So I think that ... I like to guide them, this couple in making sure that they're happy and that makes me feel confident that this will be an awesome marriage. And that as long as they have the right skills to develop their relationship at each stage and then I teach marriage education to make sure that that continues during their married years and hopefully happier and happier every single day of their life.

Benyamin: Is there one key ingredient to a healthy relationship?

Daniella: Giving. If you're always giving, then you're also receiving. In other words, if you're giving to your partner and your partner learns that that's also important that you're both giving to each other, you're both receiving. If you can always be in the mindset of doing something for your partner, whether it's a smile or you're making them coffee, or thinking of them at the store and buying them something specifically for them, or you're doing laundry, or you're doing the dishes at later points during marriage of course, then those are ingredients to an amazing marriage.

Daniella: In other words, if you're doing laundry and the other person says, this just happened to me today, it's like, "Thank you for doing all that laundry." I'm like, "My pleasure and thank you for saying." Like it means so much, right? Because everything is taken for granted otherwise, but if you want to do good for your partner, for your dating partner or your spouse then you're in it together. You're a team. You have a beautiful relationship. If someone's always doing and giving and the other person's always receiving and not giving, then that's when you have an imbalance in the relationship. And actually the Hebrew word for love, [Hebrew 00:27:45]. Like we say [Hebrew 00:27:48] or [Hebrew 00:27:49]. The root of that is [Hebrew 00:27:54] means give. So if you're giving, it's loving.

Benyamin: That's fascinating. So if I were to interview on a podcast in 10 years from now, do you think you'll still be doing matchmaking?

Daniella: Oh, that's an amazing question. I don't know. If you would have asked me this 10 years ago, I would have said, "Are you kidding?" So I have no idea, but I really love what I do. The reasons that I thought even for a second to do this is because I feel blessed to be married and happily married and look around in the world and there are a lot of people who don't know what that is. So if I'm able to help people to get to that point, like there are daters, I call it dater or dating and they have no clue what a marriage is. So it could work, it could work, it could work is their mindset. But if they're not happy, if you don't hear the happiness in their voice, if you want to stay that way, then that's not happiness and then why get married to that person? Why set yourself up for failure? But if I can be part of this awesome thing in their life, where they meet the right person and have the most amazing relationship with the person they're dating and then get engaged and then get married to that person and build a beautiful family together. Isn't that amazing? Like it is magical. So will I be doing it in 10 years? I have no idea, but we'll see.

Benyamin: Maybe in 10 years you'll be setting up your own kids I guess.

Daniella: Well, I hope earlier.

Benyamin: Are they cool with that? With mom setting them up on dates?

Daniella: Absolutely actually.

Benyamin: Okay. Good.

Daniella: They like the way I do things.

Benyamin: I like to end all my conversations with this question. Is there anything I should have asked you that I did not ask you?

Daniella: That's a great question. So I guess one thing you can ask me is, what's up my sleeve in order to make sure that everyone can get this great dating advice?

Benyamin: Yes. Excellent question Daniella.

Daniella: Thank you. So a lot of people have asked me to offer these dating tips and I actually started videotaping and I'm about to launch dating video tips and dating courses and soon also marriage education courses. I actually had ... Somebody say, "But don't you mentor the couples as they date?" And of course I do, but if I didn't know about something, I can't mentor them on that particular topic. So that was actually the springboard to realizing I better do this dating course, where everyone can listen to tips in advance so that they can prevent ridiculous things from happening while they're dating.

Benyamin: That's good. You-

Daniella: It's prevention.

Benyamin: Yeah. You're giving people the tools to put in their toolbox that they can use later.

Daniella: Exactly. I like that.

Benyamin: if people want to find you online, what's your website?

Daniella: It's marriagearchitect.com. I don't have to spell it for this crowd. Marriagearchitect.com. And they can also email me at marriagearchitect@gmail.com, if they want to book an appointment or sign up for this course that's going to come out soon. And it's very exciting. Yes. I look forward to meeting all of you.

Benyamin: Well, that's great. Thank you Daniella. Thank you so much for taking the time to chat with us today. I know you probably have a lot of people still to set up tonight in phone calls.

Daniella: I do actually. I think there's a phone call waiting because I have to send them the phone number. But yeah, it's great, I do.

Benyamin: I really appreciate you taking the time and giving us all this really interesting information about dating and relationships.

Daniella: Thank you so much Benyamin. And thank you for inviting me.

Benyamin: Bye. Take care.

Daniella: Take care. Thanks. Regards.

Benyamin: Our Friend From Israel is a production of FromTheGrapevine.com. Extra notes and a transcript of today's episode can be found at OurFriendFromIsrael.com.

Benyamin: Want behind-the-scenes access to the show? Join the Our Friend From Israel Facebook group. Subscribe to our podcast on iTunes, Google Play, or your favorite podcast app. Feel free to leave us a review there. When you do, it helps others discover Our Friend From Israel.

Benyamin: Our show is produced by Paul Kasko. Editorial help from Jamie Bender. Our head engineer is Everett Adams. Our theme music is by Haim Mazar, a Hollywood film composer who grew up in Israel. You can visit our website at OurFriendFromIsrael.com to find more episodes of the show. And if you have an idea for a future guest that we should interview, send me an email at bcohen@fromthegrapevine.com.

Benyamin: I'm your host, Benyamin Cohen, and until next time, we hope you have a great week.

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Episode 17: Daniella Rudoff, professional matchmaker and relationship coach
An expert on finding the perfect mate, staying in a healthy relationship and which pitfalls to avoid.