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There goes the sun

A partial solar eclipse on Friday wowed skygazers across the world.


March 20, 2015 | Latest Photo Prev Next
A kid watches the solar eclipse using sunglassesA kid watches the solar eclipse using sunglassesPhoto: Jack Guez / AFP/Getty Images
March 20, 2015 | Latest Photo

A partial eclipse of varying degrees was visible across most of Europe, northern Africa, northwest Asia and the Mediterranean, before finishing its show close to the North Pole. In the photo above, a child uses protective glasses to catch a glimpse of the eclipse in the coastal city of Tel Aviv.

Below, another young astronomer in Tel Aviv uses a telescope to catch a glimpse of the historical event.

A young astronomer uses a telescope to catch a glimpse of a partial solar eclipse on March 20, 2015 in the Israeli coastal city of Tel Aviv. (Photo: Jack Guez/AFP/Getty Images)

It will be another five years before these Israelis can see another eclipse in the sky above them, according to Dr. Igal Pat-El, chairman of the Israeli Astronomical Association. But if you can't wait that long, you might have another chance to view one in March 2016 while relaxing in Borneo, Sumatra, Sulawesi and parts of the Pacific Ocean.

Israelis joined those across Europe who witnessed the eclipse on Friday. “It was amazing,” Tone Hertzberg, who lives in the Norwegian archipelago of Svalbard, told the Wall Street Journal. “The sun was like a dark circle in the sky with light only around the edges. All of a sudden the streetlights came on and you could see the headlights on cars.”

The eclipse coincided with another meteorological event – the official first day of spring.

A woman uses protective glasses to catch a glimpse of a partial solar eclipse on March 20, 2015 in the Israeli coastal city of Tel Aviv.A woman uses protective glasses to catch a glimpse of a partial solar eclipse on March 20, 2015, in the Israeli coastal city of Tel Aviv. (Photo: Jack Guez/AFP/Getty Images) 

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