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As Peru flooding destroys homes and families, much-needed aid pours in

Help is arriving and schools are slowly reopening in the flood-ravaged South American country.


April 3, 2017 | Latest Photo Prev Next
IsraAID volunteers distribute supplies to children and adults in Carapongo, Peru, after devastating floods and mudslides destroyed much of the region's infrastructure.IsraAID volunteers distribute supplies to children and adults in Carapongo, Peru, after devastating floods and mudslides destroyed much of the region's infrastructure.Photo: IsraAID
April 3, 2017 | Latest Photo

Dozens have died and hundreds of thousands of people have lost their homes after unprecedented floods and mudslides across the South American country of Peru. Naturally, with a disaster as devastating as this, the need for aid – in the form of supplies, water, food and shelter – is paramount.

The United States and China have both announced that they're allocating funds to donate to the country, which is still dealing with extreme flooding. For example, in Carapongo, residents are without the most basic necessities like food, safe water and personal hygiene. Many relief groups are helping out as well. IsraAID – an Israeli-based nonprofit humanitarian group that has dispatched rescue teams in emergency locations such as Louisiana, Haiti, West Virginia and Nepal – is on the ground in Peru's most devastated communities.

Shelter tents line the dirt roads of Peru's flood-ravaged communities.Shelter tents line the dirt roads of Peru's flood-ravaged communities. (Photo: IsraAID)

IsraAID is conducting training on trauma recovery with teachers, service providers and social workers.

"Hearing stories of people who lost everything is heartbreaking, but we continue to be amazed by people's ability to stay together, and help each other overcome these difficult times," said Naama Gorodischer, IsraAID's programs director and the team leader in Peru. She and her team are focused on working in the local communities to help them rebuild and reopen schools. Officials in Peru said some schools were preparing to resume classes on Monday.

An IsraAID volunteer talks with a resident.An IsraAID volunteer talks with a resident. (Photo: IsraAID)

The challenge, IsraAID team members say, is setting up a safe, trauma-free environment for children when they return to school. The team prepared back-to-school kits for kids to help them.

Locally, Peru has distributed 4,000 metric tons of aid so far, most in the form of donations from surviving Peruvian families and institutions. Direct Relief, a nonprofit based in Santa Barbara, Calif., just delivered more than 23,000 pounds of medicines and medical aid to the country.

IsraAID volunteers distribute goods to children in Carapongo, Peru, as they return to classes in makeshift tents.IsraAID volunteers distribute goods to children in Carapongo, Peru, as they return to classes in makeshift tents. (Photo: IsraAID)

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Related Topics: Environment, Humanitarian