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Archaeologists unearth ancient fort in Jerusalem

The structure's location had eluded authorities for more than a century.


November 6, 2015 | Latest Photo Prev Next
The site of the Acra, an ancient fort in Jerusalem, had eluded archeologists for more than a century.The site of the Acra, an ancient fort in Jerusalem, had eluded archeologists for more than a century.Photo: GALI TIBBON/AFP/Getty Images)
November 6, 2015 | Latest Photo

Excavators in Jerusalem have unearthed what they believe to be the ruins of the Acra, an ancient citadel constructed by the Greek king Antiochus IV Epiphanes, who conquered the city more than 2,000 years ago.

The Greek king Antiochus IV Epiphanes built the fort after taking control of Jerusalem more than 2,000 years ago.The Greek king Antiochus IV Epiphanes built the fort after taking control of Jerusalem more than 2,000 years ago. (Photo: GALI TIBBON/AFP/Getty Images)

The discovery of the Acra is "a dream come true," the Israel Antiquities Authority said in a statement.

"It has been an open question in the archaeology of Jerusalem," Dr. Doron Ben-Ami, the excavation director, told Fox News. "For hundreds of years, scholars, archaeologists and historians have been looking for the location of Acra."

Workers from the Israeli Antiquity Authorities dig at the site of the Acra.Workers from the Israel Antiquity Authorities dig at the site of the Acra. (Photo: GALI TIBBON/AFP/Getty Images)

Sling stones, bronze arrowheads and ballista stones were found at the excavation site.Sling stones, bronze arrowheads and ballista stones were found at the excavation site. (Photo: GALI TIBBON/AFP/Getty Images)

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Related Topics: Archaeology