(From left to right): Peter, Andrew and Philip all came from the same neighborhood. (From left to right): Peter, Andrew and Philip all came from the same neighborhood. (From left to right): Peter, Andrew and Philip all came from the same neighborhood. (Photo: Wikimedia)

Archaeologists discover lost home of Jesus' apostles

The birthplace of Peter, Philip and Andrew – near the Sea of Galilee in Israel – was just found hundreds of feet below sea level.

A team of archaeologists in Israel just discovered a real estate listing that had been lost for millennia. Digging deep into the Earth's crust, at 211 feet below sea level, they found what's thought to be the location of the lost city of Julias. It's there that three of Jesus' apostles – Peter, Philip and Andrew – were born.

Julias, originally known as Bethsaida, was renamed after Julias Augusta, the mother of Emperor Tiberius. Their recent discovery included a bathhouse and glass mosaic tiles that possibly belonged to a church that stood atop the apostles' birthplace.

Ruins from the fishing village of Julias by the Sea of Galilee in Israel.Ruins from the fishing village of Julias by the Sea of Galilee in Israel. (Photo: Wikimedia)

There had actually been three potential locations for Julias. But the archaeologists believe they've now found the strongest candidate thanks to the ruins they unearthed at this location by the Sea of Galilee in Israel. Scholars from the University of Haifa, the Yigal Alon Kinneret Limnological Laboratory and Kinneret College confirmed the findings.

The discovery of the apostles' homes is just the latest in a string of archaeological discoveries in Israel as of late. Last month, we found out that the Mediterranean may have been home to 16th-century pirates, and the month before that colored fabrics were found in an ancient copper mine.

A surprising number of discoveries in Israel in the past few years have been made by children. While playing with friends, a 7-year-old stumbled upon a 3,400-year-old figurine. A class of students found a 900-year-old piece of jewelry in a Crusader castle, while another group stepped into what they believe to be 1,500-year-old donkey manure.

To help store the influx of findings, a 350,000-square-foot complex is being built in Jerusalem. It will soon open to the public and be home to 2 million ancient artifacts.

MORE FROM THE GRAPEVINE:

Photos and SlideshowsPhotos and Slideshows

Related Topics: Archaeology

comments powered by Disqus