A new app allows you to find a name that best matches your baby based on your own preferences. A new app allows you to find a name that best matches your baby based on your own preferences. A new app allows you to find a name that best matches your baby based on your own preferences. (Photo: Gino Santa Maria/Shutterstock)

Baby naming gets a tech upgrade with new app

Developers use an algorithm to find names you're more likely to choose – and weed out the ones you won't.

How to name a child? There are, of course, the tried-and-true methods – naming him/her in honor of an esteemed public figure (gymnast Simone Biles has become a popular choice during the Olympics) or after a favorite fruit, perhaps, as in the case of Gwyneth Paltrow and Chris Martin naming their firstborn Apple.

But for those of you who can't find such inspiration, there's now an app to help you out.

The Namestork aims to be the ultimate baby-naming recommendation engine. The brainchild of Roy Golan, a Jerusalem app developer, and an unnamed partner, it's the outcome of their desire to develop an algorithm that would be more practical and useful than traditional apps and sites that simply provide a rundown of names.

"We wanted to create an algorithm that succeeded in offering items the user is more likely to like rather than just being presented with an endless list of items. And then we thought it would be nice if it could work with names for babies," Golan told From The Grapevine.

The Namestork’s recommendation algorithm incorporates a dataset of more than 30,000 names and data gathered during the web app’s beta phase in Israel. The updated app, which works on most mobile and desktop devices, was officially released in English on June 28.

The Namestork’s recommendation algorithm utilizes a dataset of more than 30,000 names.The Namestork’s recommendation algorithm utilizes a dataset of more than 30,000 names. (Photo: Screenshot)

The Namestork's website claims the "algorithm is designed to efficiently find names matching the personal taste of each individual user."

After trying the app myself, and inputting four common names – Paul, James, Michael and Peter – I can confirm that, while the results are certainly not definitive, there was an impressive breadth of possibilities offered. Noah, Quinn, Riley, Hunter, Isaac and Landon were just a few of the many names generated by the data I gave.

"The basic idea behind the app is that an item that is showing up on the favorite lists of a user is most likely to be related to the other items in the same list," Golan told us. "We then use algorithms to take all this information to generate a high-quality recommendation."

While still in its infancy (pun intended), the app will continue to refine itself as more data is entered. And Golan and his partner would like to push further with what it can do.

"We're interested in getting the data and allowing people more and more insight," Golan said.

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Related Topics: Apps, Parenting