Fascinators are formal headwear worn commonly at weddings, derbies and other occasions. Fascinators are formal headwear worn commonly at weddings, derbies and other occasions. Fascinators are formal headwear worn commonly at weddings, derbies and other occasions. (Photo: Getty Images/Danielle Mazin)

How to rock a fascinator like a royal

Because your head needs a statement.

Have you been hit with Royal Wedding Fever yet? The rumors, the anticipation, the planning, the fanfare, the wardrobe ... it's almost like we know these people! So as we sit back in our relatively ordinary, very non-royal digs and live vicariously through the lovely royal couple, we could use a little ... distraction.

Cue the pretty hats!

Young beautiful lady dressed in a proper outfit for horse racing with hat and gloves, fashion on the field, vintage matte effect The classic fascinator. (Photo: Chrisstina Morgan/Shutterstock)

More specifically, the classic fascinator. If you're not familiar with the term, let us school you.

It's a piece of formal headwear commonly worn at weddings, derbies and other special occasions.

It's also known as a cocktail hat. They come in all shapes, sizes, colors and accessorized with all manner of flair and flora.

The trend has brought millinery, the art of making hats, back into fashion.

Danielle Mazin makes and sells headwear that caters for all ages, both for everyday use and for that special VIP occasion. Danielle Mazin makes and sells headwear that caters for all ages, both for everyday use and for that special VIP occasion. (Photo: Danielle Mazin)

Israeli designer Danielle Mazin opened her own millinery business a few years ago after studying at the London College of Fashion. She now sells these unique pieces in her own eponymous shop in Tel Aviv.

Mazin's shop isn't the only place you can score her one-of-a-kind headwear. Mazin also stocks fascinators, evening wear hats and other headpieces at retail locations in New York, New Jersey, Toronto and London.

But ... why fascinators? What's all the ... fascination about?

Well, first off, they're classy, elegant and timeless. But if you're a proper anglophile, you know something else about them:

They've been a tradition of the British Royal Family for centuries.

Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge dons an all-white suit with matching fascinator at the Last Post ceremony in Ypres, Belgium, in 2017. Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge dons an all-white suit with matching fascinator at the Last Post ceremony in Ypres, Belgium, in 2017. (Photo: Chris Jackson/Getty Images)

It's old hat for the elite, but the fascinator was thrust into supertrend status fairly recently with the marriage of Kate Middleton and Prince William, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge. And now, with the May 19 nuptials of William's younger brother, Harry, to American actress Meghan Markle, appeal for the charming accessory is once again emerging.

And sure enough, the royal apple doesn't far from the tree.

Meghan Markle attends Christmas Day Church service at Church of St Mary Magdalene on December 25, 2017 in King's Lynn, England. Royalty looks good on you, Meghan. (Photo: Chris Jackson/Getty Images)

Industry insiders would call Markle's choice of headwear, worn to a Christmas Day service at the Church of St. Mary Magdalene in England last year, a "hatinator." That's exactly what it sounds like: a combination hat and fascinator.

Is your head feeling a little naked all of a sudden?

And maybe you're hurriedly trying to come up with excuses to wear one? No excuses – or occasions needed. You can even make one yourself, like so:

Just pin one on, smile and start strutting down that imaginary red carpet strewn across your living room.

Danielle Mazin hats It really brings out your good side. (Photo: Danielle Mazin)

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