hazelnut jam thumbprint cookies hazelnut jam thumbprint cookies Israeli Kitchen Thumbprint cookies go back a few generations, but their flavor and adorable presentation make them timeless. (Photo: Sarah Berkowitz)

Hazelnut jam thumbprints

An old-fashioned cookie with modern, wholesome ingredients – did we mention it's vegan and gluten-free, too?

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  • Yield: 16 cookies
  • Prep time: 15 minutes
  • Cook time: 20 minutes

Who doesn’t remember jam thumbprints from the previous generation of bakers, who put love, lard and who-knows-what-else into their cooking? I found this wonderful updated version of a favorite cookie in a new cookbook by Rachelle Tolwin, an artist and self-taught vegetarian foodie. Rachelle and her husband live on a farm in upstate New York, grow their own veggies, cook small batches of maple syrup from their maple trees, can foods for the brutal Northern winters, lead yoga retreats near their 200-year-old barn, and just generally live the kind of life that makes the rest of us city and suburb dwellers give a long, dreamy sigh.

So yeah, we can’t all live the life. But we can whip up farm-style goodness in our own kitchens using wholesome, nutritious ingredients. And trust me, when people taste these cookies warm from the oven, they’ll give a long, dreamy sigh. And then take another one.

Consider doubling this cookie recipe – they freeze beautifully and taste delicious after sitting out to defrost for just 10-15 minutes. 


Ingredients

  • 1 cup ground hazelnuts or almonds
  • 1 cup gluten-free flour blend
  • 1/3 cup coconut or cane sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/3 cup coconut oil, melted
  • 1/2 cup fruit jam

Directions

Preheat oven to 350° F.

Mix ground nuts, flour and sugar in large bowl. Add coconut oil and vanilla and mix well.

Scoop out small mounds of dough and create balls. Press center of each one to create an indentation. Fill with a teaspoon of jam.

Bake for 20 minutes, or until cookies just begin to turn brown. Cool on wire rack.

hazelnut jam thumbprint cookiesThese cookies can be frozen and eaten later – if you happen to have any leftovers. (Photo: Sarah Berkowitz)

Related Topics: Baking, Desserts

Recipes from the Israeli KitchenRecipes from the Israeli Kitchen
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