Impossible Pork samples are displayed during an Impossible Foods press event for CES 2020 on January 6, 2020 in Las Vegas. Impossible Pork samples are displayed during an Impossible Foods press event for CES 2020 on January 6, 2020 in Las Vegas. Impossible Pork samples are displayed during an Impossible Foods press event for CES 2020 in Las Vegas. (Photo: David Becker/Getty Images)

Plant-based Impossible Pork is coming to town

From the makers of the Impossible Burger, the new lab-grown meatless pork product was unveiled this week at the Consumer Electronics Show.

Is the "other white meat" getting the plant-based treatment? After a buzz-filled unveiling at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas this week, Impossible Foods has begun rolling out a version of its pork product – the Impossible Croissan'wich – at five test cities across the U.S. And, just like the Impossible Whopper, you'll find this one at Burger King, for a limited time.

Since we know it's from the same people who brought you the Impossible Burger – a group of Silicon Valley food-industry insiders that includes Tal Ronnen, an Israeli chef and restaurateur – we know that Impossible Pork is made from plants, in a lab, and engineered to taste and look like the real thing. Like its ground beef substitute, Impossible Pork's main protein is soy, and the major fat sources are sunflower oil and coconut oil. It is made using heme, an iron-containing compound found in all living organisms that can be produced without farming animals.

"We won't stop until we eliminate the need for animals in the food chain and make the global food system sustainable," said Patrick Brown, Impossible Foods' founder and chief executive.

The company teamed up with Burger King in April last year to provide the meatless Impossible Whopper to its 7,000 U.S. restaurants. Now, Impossible Croissan'wich will be available at 139 Burger King restaurants in five test regions: Savannah, Georgia; Lansing, Michigan; Springfield, Illinois; Albuquerque, New Mexico; and Montgomery, Alabama.

Plant-based meat alternatives comprise a rapidly growing industry. Impossible's close competitor, Beyond Meat, also sells plant-based ground meat and sausages. That company has joined McDonald's and KFC to test plant-based burger and plant-based fried chicken, respectively.

Market research firm UBS predicts the plant-based meat market will grow by 28% a year and reach $85 billion by 2030.

In an interview with From The Grapevine in July, Ronnen said Impossible Foods had always planned to expand beyond beef and hamburgers. "Impossible's goals are to have plant-based alternatives to all meat, fish, poultry and dairy," he said.

The Impossible Whopper trial at select Burger King stores was so successful, the chain is expanding the offering to more than 7,000 locations. Impossible Foods aims to create plant-based meat and dairy products indistinguishable from the real thing. (Photo: Michael Thomas/Getty Images)

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Plant-based Impossible Pork is coming to town
From the makers of the Impossible Burger, the new lab-grown meatless pork product was unveiled this week at the Consumer Electronics Show.