The hummus is the eatery's signature item. The hummus is the eatery's signature item. The hummus is the eatery's signature item. (Photo: Austin Langlois)

Dizengoff’s Miami debut brings Israeli fare to South Florida

James Beard Award-winning chef Michael Solomonov adds another restaurant to his portfolio.

In a city where croquetas and Cuban cafecito rule the streets, James Beard Award-winning chef Michael Solomonov and partner Steve Cook launched the newest location of their famous casual hummus restaurant Dizengoff.

Even though it’s similar to the Philadelphia and New York City locations with the bold pink logo, red counter and loud Tel Aviv poster wallpaper – this iteration of Dizengoff feels right at home in Miami’s Wynwood neighborhood. Wynwood is often referred to as the "Brooklyn of Miami,” attracting romper wearers and craft coffee drinkers by the thousands. It’s quickly becoming the hotspot for culinary pursuits outside of the city's typical Caribbean and South American flavors.

Enter Dizengoff, which occupies the building next door to Solomonov's Federal Donuts restaurant.

Like the other locations, the Miami branch has a bold black and pink motif.Like the other locations, the Miami branch has a bold black and pink motif. (Photo: Austin Langlois)

The bright colors, high ceilings and tall windows make the walk-up counter and small dining area feel larger than they are. Dizengoff Miami has a similar menu to its predecessors. The star is the hummus, with its bold spices and layers of Mediterranean flavors. It’s spun in small batches throughout the day in a commercial food processor, which gives it an airy consistency that’d be hard to replicate at home or from a prepackaged container.

Patrons checking out the new restaurant.Patrons checking out the new restaurant. (Photo: Austin Langlois)

The menu features five hummus dishes. The classic tehina is the only constant, as the rest of the menu rotates throughout the month. Then, diners can expect one protein (lamb or chicken) and three vegetarian options (like the corn masabacha with chickpeas).

Each hummus entree comes with a side of hearth-baked pita and a tangy variation on the traditional cucumber-tomato Israeli salad.

And oh, the pita bread. Rolled fresh every morning and put to the fiery test, the pita comes to the table fresh out of the oven ready to be loaded up with a scoop of your chosen chickpea concoction. It all pairs perfectly with the frozen lemonade made with fresh mint leaves and lemons.

At left, the minty frozen lemonade; and at left, vintage baseball cards serve as table numbers.At left, the minty frozen lemonade; and at left, vintage baseball cards serve as table numbers. (Photo: Austin Langlois)

For diners looking for something more adventurous – a dish from North Africa might become your new brunch favorite. Only served on Sundays during the brunch hours, shakshouka is a dish of poached eggs swimming in spicy peppers and tomato stew served in a sizzling mini skillet.

And speaking of eggs, there’s a cryptic “add egg” option under the hummus platters on the menu. Don’t disregard this delectable treat. It’s a hard-boiled egg brined in coffee, cardamom, cinnamon and mint that’s added to the top of your dish. It adds a soulful savoriness that you won’t find anywhere else.

If you’re on a quest for the authentic, this hummusiya (that’s a fancy name for a hummus restaurant) will transport you to Israel – just without the blazing summer sun. Oh wait, it’s Miami. You get the blazing summer sun, too.

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Dizengoff’s Miami debut brings Israeli fare to South Florida
With Dizengoff Miami, James Beard Award-winning chef Michael Solomonov adds another restaurant to his portfolio.