Chef Granit can be found frequently in the center of Shabour's circular bar, cooking his wares for hungry guests. Chef Granit can be found frequently in the center of Shabour's circular bar, cooking his wares for hungry guests. Chef Granit can be found frequently in the center of Shabour's circular bar, cooking his wares for hungry guests. (Photo: The Social Food)

Israeli-owned restaurant is No. 1 in Paris after only 3 months

Shabour is drawing high praise from critics in a city that's unmatched in fine dining.

The dizzying pace and make-or-break competitive cycle of the Paris "foodosphere" has left little room for imperfection. Indeed, in a city that's teeming with the world's best cuisines and restaurants, it's a challenge to do business here, even for the most experienced and well-known chefs and restaurateurs.

So how did Shabour, the newest outpost from award-winning restaurateurs Assaf Granit and Uri Navon, manage to climb straight to top billing in the French capital after only three months in operation?

Uri Navon has joined Ganit in several restaurant ventures around the world. Uri Navon has joined Granit in several restaurant ventures around the world. (Photo: The Social Food)

Quite a feat for a restaurant in its infancy: Le Figaroscope, a well-respected gastronomical guide in Paris, named Shabour "Best Restaurant of the Year" in its latest ranking.

One reason for this is, undoubtedly, Granit's meteoric rise on the scene. Born and raised in Jerusalem, he's melded his Mediterranean upbringing with his exposure and training in European culture and fine dining. Along with Navon, the duo opened 12 restaurants – most notably the Palomar, rated the U.K.'s top restaurant several years running, and the highly praised Machneyuda in Jerusalem. This is Granit's second restaurant in Paris; his first, Balagan, also opened to glowing fanfare.

Shabour's culinary team, with Granit front and center. Shabour's culinary team, with Granit front and center and Navon at far left. (Photo: The Social Food)

"I was born and raised in Jerusalem, and this is where I learned to cook, by following my grandmother and exploring the different tastes and aromas of the Jerusalem’s streets – from the stalls in the markets to her frying pan," Granit explained on his website. "I had always wanted to open my own restaurant, a place that would reflect the secrets of my grandmother and the culinary secrets of Jerusalem, and together with my best friend and fellow chef, Uri Navon, we have made this dream come true."

Another reason for Shabour's rapid rise in popularity is its setting. In a corner storefront that once housed a jazz club, Shabour is relaxing, welcoming and sexy – with a brand of familial hospitality that's not always present in Parisian dining. It proudly showcases the style of the surrounding neighborhood: freestone walls, cement and stainless steel. But the food takes on quite a different persona: rigorously crafted, expertly blended, with an aristocratic flair. Diners adore the tortellini with chorizo, machluta, labane and pine nuts; grilled leeks stuffed with crème fraîche and topped with chanterelle mushrooms and capers; and wagyu beef with freekeh, eggplant caramel and dukkah spices.

Poached smoked egg from Shabour. Poached smoked egg from Shabour. (Photo: The Social Food)

Guests are seated around a bustling marble-topped bar where Chef Granit works his magic, encouraging a banquet-like atmosphere without the clutter and chaos.

With such a strong reputation, it's no surprise that it can take up to six weeks to get a reservation at Shabour. So if you're planning a trip to the City of Lights, it's best to book a table early, and arrive hungry.

Chef Uri Navon in Shabour kitchen At Shabour, the kitchen brings the heat, and the guests bring their appetites. (Photo: The Social Food)

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Israeli-owned restaurant is No. 1 in Paris after only 3 months
How did Shabour earn Le Figarascope's Best Restaurant of the Year in Paris? Hint: the secret ingredient is it's Israeli chef.