Students show off some of the many experiments inspired by Einstein. Students show off some of the many experiments inspired by Einstein. Students show off some of the many experiments inspired by Einstein. (Photo: Benyamin Cohen)

All about Einstein: West Virginia University pays tribute to the world's favorite genius

Weekend event shows off physics, experiments ... and interpretative dancing?!?

With the March for Science on Saturday and Tuesday night's debut of a new TV series about the life of Albert Einstein, this weekend proved the perfect time for an Einstein-themed confab. And that's exactly what occurred on the campus of West Virginia University in the picturesque Appalachian Mountains.

The school's "Celebrating Einstein" conference was truly a multi-disciplinary event. Lectures by physics professors were enhanced by theater students performing an interpretative dance during his speech. An artist who made clay-molded black hole bowls mingled with science fair projects that showed the inner workings of gravitational waves. In total, more than 1,000 people took part in all the festivities.

A local artist made special cups for the occasion with Einstein's mug on one side and gravitational waves on the other.A local artist made special cups for the occasion with Einstein's mug on one side and gravitational waves on the other. (Photo: Benyamin Cohen)

West Virginia artist Sarah Guerry made various black hole-inspired ceramic bowls.West Virginia artist Sarah Guerry made various black hole-inspired ceramic bowls. (Photo: Benyamin Cohen)

"The interest in Einstein does not fade into history," Hanoch Gutfreund, the director of the Albert Einstein Archives at Hebrew University in Jerusalem, told From The Grapevine. "If one can say anything about this, the interest in Einstein increases with time. It's greater now."

We were on the ground in Morgantown, W.Va., for a firsthand glimpse of the fun.

A science student (left) shows his experiment to one of the attendees.A science student (left) shows his experiment to one of the attendees. (Photo: Benyamin Cohen)

One of the many experiments on display at the event.One of the many science experiments on display at the event. (Photo: Benyamin Cohen)

One experiment on display shows attendees how radio waves interact with images.One experiment on display shows attendees how radio waves interact with images. (Photo: Benyamin Cohen)

This student has a hair-raising moment after touching a ball with static electricity.This student has a hair-raising moment after touching a ball with static electricity. (Photo: Benyamin Cohen)

And now for some scenes from the danced lecture:

Dr. Sean McWilliams, a theoretical astrophysicist at WVU, discusses gravitational waves as the dances interpret his words.Dr. Sean McWilliams, a theoretical astrophysicist at WVU, discusses gravitational waves as the dances interpret his words. (Photo: Benyamin Cohen)

The WVU School of Theatre and Dance presented a "'danced' lecture on Einstein's theories.The WVU School of Theatre and Dance presented a "'danced' lecture on Einstein's theories. (Photo: Benyamin Cohen)


Some more clips from tonight's danced lecture at @westvirginiau's #CelebratingEinstein conference.

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The Celebrating Einstein event was co-sponsored by West Virginia University and the National Science Foundation.The Celebrating Einstein event was co-sponsored by West Virginia University and the National Science Foundation. (Photo: Benyamin Cohen)

We here at From The Grapevine were honored to be a part of the weekend's festivities. During a Facebook Live event broadcast on Friday, we were interviewed about the dozens of Einstein-related stories we've written during the past couple years. You can watch that video below:


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