Delphi and Mobileye hope their partnership will make driverless cars a reality soon. Delphi and Mobileye hope their partnership will make driverless cars a reality soon. Delphi and Mobileye hope their partnership will make driverless cars a reality soon. (Photo: Delphi)

Las Vegas to be backdrop for groundbreaking driverless car demonstration

The most complex automated drive ever publicly shown will take place in the city in January.

In the race to make driverless cars a reality, the little guys might end up winning.

British-based Delphi Automotive and Mobileye – which is based out of Jerusalem, Israel – are two relatively small companies that are set to show off how actual autonomous driving would work. The two have announced that come January in Las Vegas, they'll conduct the most complex automated drive ever publicly demonstrated on an urban and highway combined route.

Delphi and Mobileye have worked together to develop the Centralized Sensing Localization and Planning (CSLP) automated driving system.The two companies have worked together to develop an automated driving system. (Photo: Mobileye)

The 6.3-mile drive will showcase Delphi and Mobileye's Centralized Sensing Localization and Planning (CSLP) automated driving system, which they say will hit the roads by 2019. CSLP is the first turnkey, fully integrated automated driving solution with an industry-leading perception system and computing platform.

The Las Vegas drive – which will coincide with the popular Consumer Electronics Show – will tackle everyday driving challenges such as highway merges, congested city streets with pedestrians and cyclists and a tunnel.

Dozens of corporations around the world are currently working toward making driverless cars (and trucks) a reality by the end of this decade, but so far none has been able to pull out ahead of the pack.

That's not to say they don't know what's necessary to do so.

Google's prototype driverless car started road tests this summer.Google's prototype driverless car started road tests in 2015. (Photo: Google)

"Three factors will separate the leader from the pack in the race to offer driverless vehicles by 2019 best-in-class: perception sensors such as cameras, radar and LiDAR, automotive experience and computer processing speed," said Glen De Vos, vice president of services for Delphi.

Mobileye, founded by a researcher at Hebrew University in Israel, and Delphi are hoping to end up at the top of the heap. Their CSLP system, developed in conjunction with Intel, will feature several advanced technologies including localization and mapping capabilities that ensure the vehicle knows its location within 10 centimeters even without GPS connectivity; 3D vehicle detection that detects vehicles at any angle and path; and motion planning that allows the car to behave more human-like in its driving behavior.

Mobileye joins other Israeli companies at the forefront of the new auto revolution. These tech firms are making a name for themselves in the industry – especially in automation, artificial intelligence, collision avoidance and navigation.

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Las Vegas to be backdrop for groundbreaking driverless car demonstration
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