Technology can now turn air into water. Technology can now turn air into water. Technology can now turn air into water. (Photo: Pabkov / Shutterstock)

How one Florida town is turning air into water

To combat drought and prepare for hurricane season, Miami Gardens is the first U.S. city to use this Israeli tech.

When you think of amazing new sci-fi-style technology, you might imagine inventors in San Francisco or New York. But the U.S. city on the cutting edge of water technology is, surprisingly, a suburb of Miami.

Miami Gardens will be the first town in the country to turn air into water. The idea sounds like something out of a medieval alchemy legend, but it's already been enacted outside of the country. In fact, the company bringing the program to Florida is an Israeli startup called Water-Gen.

“Miami Gardens is our first significant pilot program in a U.S. city,” said Yehuda Kaploun, Water-Gen USA's president. “We are ideally positioned to enable communities to tap into a clean and safe drinking water source with a refreshing taste," he explained without sounding like an advertisement.

The company basically manufactures machines that draw in air and create condensation, yielding drinking water. Water-Gen's CEO Arye Kohavi, told the Huffington Post that the technology "leverages the same process as a dehumidifier, but instead captures and cleans the moisture." Kohavi, an alumnus of Hebrew University in Jerusaelm, said all that's required is "an electrical outlet and the humidity found in the air.”

Abstract blur palm leaves moving in hurricane.Water supplies can be contaminated during tropical storms and hurricanes. (Photo: hbpictures/Shutterstock)

This all comes at a good time for the already drought-stricken state. With hurricane season heating up, more water is likely to be contaminated by the storms, and Floridians might end up in even more of a water crisis than usual.

“As representatives responsible for the quality of life and safety of our communities, preparedness and readiness to counter crises is mandatory,” said Oliver Gilbert, the mayor of Miami Gardens. “Water-Gen’s pilot will enable us to measure its use for clean drinking water if needed for hurricane relief and any other emergency water situation that may arise.”

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