Israeli rescuers inspect damaged buildings in Alvaro Obregon, an area of Mexico City strongly affected by the quake. Israeli rescuers inspect damaged buildings in Alvaro Obregon, an area of Mexico City strongly affected by the quake. Israeli rescuers inspect damaged buildings in Alvaro Obregon, an area of Mexico City strongly affected by the quake. (Photo: Luis Manuel Perez / AFP/Getty Images)

High-tech tool gives rescuers X-ray vision

After a devastating earthquake in Mexico, a device is helping first responders see through walls in search of victims.

As rescue workers and humanitarian volunteers continue to dig through the wreckage after the tragic earthquake in Mexico last week, they have multiple tools at their disposal. One of them is a tool that allows them to see through walls.

Developed by an Israeli startup called Camero, the device actually enables first responders to see if there are people under the rubble and where they are situated. In addition, the system offers a first-of-its-kind capability to map the general shape of the room, behind the wall or under collapsed ceilings, with high sensitivity for detection of non-moving live objects. It can penetrate through cement, plaster, brick, concrete, drywall and other standard building materials.

Amir Beeri, an alum of Tel Aviv University in Israel, is the company's CEO and co-founder. "It changes the game," he said. "Once you can see through walls, you can save lives and you can do things much more effectively."

Camero-Tech's device is compact, lightweight, durable and can see through walls.Camero's device is compact, lightweight, durable and can see through walls. (Photo: Courtesy photo)

The device, which is already being used in 30 countries around the world including in the U.S., is similar to another Israeli invention that claims X-ray technology. Vayyar Imaging, a Tel Aviv-based startup, uses 3D-sensing technology to see through concrete – but much more as well. Their sensors can give you the nutritional information of drinks like milk and, in some cases, can scan bodies searching for cancer.

Camero's tool isn't the only Israeli invention to help in the event of an earthquake. The Earthquake Safe Table was created by Arthur Brutter, a student at Jerusalem's Bezalel Academy of Art and Design, for his final school project. He teamed up with his professor, Ido Bruno, and together they licensed their design to a school furniture manufacturer.

Famed Israeli designer Ron Arad mentored the duo on the project. "It's not about doing a show-stopper, visually. It's about being a disaster-stopper," Arad said.

Israel has a history of helping out other countries in the wake of natural disasters. After the devastating earthquakes in both Haiti and Nepal, the humanitarian non-profit IsraAid dispatched a team of people to help with the relief efforts and assist in getting much-needed medical supplies to those in need. Their rescue efforts are not just limited to the days following a tragic event, but often last for months afterwards as they help rebuild communities.

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