Leah Busque received credit for coining the phrase "service networking," which is now an industry-wide term. Leah Busque received credit for coining the phrase "service networking," which is now an industry-wide term. Leah Busque received credit for coining the phrase "service networking," which is now an industry-wide term. (Photo: OFFICIAL LEWEB PHOTOS/Flickr)

7 of the top women in tech

These entrepreneurs could be the future power players of the tech world.

Once dominated by men, the technology industry is slowly but surely evolving to ensure that women are increasing their ranks. Today, women hold some of the most powerful positions in the industry. There's Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg, Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer, Oracle CFO Safra Catz – the list goes on.

In order to maintain progress, new generations of standout, pioneering women are needed to keep the momentum going and inspire others to enter the field. Here are a few young women we think will do that.


Leah Busque, CEO, TaskRabbit (USA)

In 2008 Busque started RunMyErrand, which eventually morphed into TaskRabbit, an online and mobile marketplace that allows users to outsource small jobs and tasks to verified individuals in search of temp work. Today she's CEO of the company, which employs dozens of individuals and gives thousands more the opportunity to earn income doing odd jobs. As she told Huffington Post in 2014, "I've had some very strong female role models, so I think that's an important thing."


Privahini Bradoo, Co-Founder & CEO, BlueOak (USA)

Bradoo earned a PhD in Neuroscience from the University of Auckland and attended Harvard Business School as a Fulbright Scholar before co-founding BlueOak in 2010. The aim of the company is to use existing technologies to dispose of of e-waste – the fastest growing waste stream in the world. They're doing this not by building landfills, but rather mini-refineries that extract the gold, silver, copper and rare earth minerals from our discarded gadgets and gizmos.


Moran Bar, Founder & CEO, Geektime (Israel)

Moran Bar is Co-Founder and CEO of GeekMedia, which publishes Israel's leading English-language tech blog, Geektime.Moran Bar is Co-Founder and CEO of GeekMedia, which publishes Israel's leading English-language tech blog, Geektime. (Photo: Moran Bar)

Israel has one of the most vibrant and successful tech scenes in the world, and Bar has considerable influence over it. She co-founded and and is currently CEO of GeekMedia, which publishes the largest tech blog in Israel, Geektime, and is also CEO of VentureGeeks, a startup accelerator program. In 2012 she was named to the Top 100 Women In Tech In Europe list by Girls in Tech London. Her advice to peers? Work together. "I believe that everyone needs some guidance along the way, and I'm there for others as others were there for me when I started."


Lindsey Nefesh-Clarke, Founder and Managing Director, Women's WorldWide Web (France)

Nefesh-Clarke created the ultimate online destination for those keen to empower women around the world. Women's WorldWide Web (W4) enables investors to contribute to innovative, grassroots girls’ and women’s empowerment projects, in developing and developed countries. "The future is connected and collaborative," said Nefesh-Clarke. "Each click is driving positive momentum."


Angela Benton, Founder & CEO, NewME (USA)

Benton first came to prominence in 2007 when she launched Black Web 2.0, a platform for African Americans interested in technology. Her focus on minority communities eventually led her to co-found the NewME Accelerator, the first technology incubator for minorities, which continues to publish Black Web 2.0, though it's been spruced up and renamed B20.


Natalia Oberti Noguera, Founder & CEO, Pipeline Fellowship (USA)

Natalia O NogueraNatalia Oberti Noguera's PipeLine Fellowship has successfully helped launch the tech careers of many women. (Photo: Women's eNews/Flickr)

Noguera is the founder and CEO of Pipeline Fellowship, an angel investing bootcamp that trains women philanthropists and creates capital for female social entrepreneurs. According to the organization's website, "Since its April 2011 launch, more than 100 women have graduated from the program and over 15 women-led for-profit social ventures have secured funding."


Reshma Saujani, Founder, Girls Who Code (USA)

ReshmaGirls Who Code is the brianchild of Reshma Saujani, who founded the organization due to the lack of girls in high school computer science classes. (Photo: Women's eNews/Flickr)

Saujani founded the nonprofit organization Girls Who Code in 2012, shortly after a failed congressional bid. She came up with the idea during her run when she noticed that schools along her campaign route lacked girls in computer science classrooms. Today the organization aims to support and increase the number of women in computer science through programs that teach computing and programming skills to high school girls.

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