Attendees check out the various booths at the TechCrunch Disrupt conference in New York. Attendees check out the various booths at the TechCrunch Disrupt conference in New York. Attendees check out the various booths at the TechCrunch Disrupt conference in New York. (Photo: Noam Galai / Getty Images for TechCrunch)

5 cool startups we saw at the TechCrunch Disrupt conference

From the look of things, it appears the future has definitely arrived.

From a company that promises easy access to filtered water to one that aims to bring Internet access to the most remote villages, the latest innovative technologies were on display this week at the TechCrunch Disrupt conference in Manhattan. In addition to the myriad speakers and convention hall packed with booths, 24 companies competed in the Startup Battlefield challenge. The winner walked away with a cash prize and, perhaps more important, coveted bragging rights to the annual contest. But all of the startups were worthy adversaries.

Below are five startups that caught our attention at the conference:

Liquidity

Victor Hwang, co-founder of Liquidity, shows off his product at TechCrunch Disrupt.Victor Hwang, co-founder of Liquidity, shows off his product at TechCrunch Disrupt. (Photo: Noam Galai/Getty Images for TechCrunch)

Developed after 15 years of research at New York's Stony Brook University, Liquidity has created a consumer water bottle with a patented filtration membrane built-in. It's inexpensive and practical – and the filter only needs to be changed once every three months. It's no wonder the company took the top prize at the conference.


CoroNet

Dror Liwer, co-founder at CoroNet, speaks onstage during TechCrunch Disrupt.Dror Liwer, co-founder at CoroNet, speaks onstage during TechCrunch Disrupt. (Photo: Noam Galai/Getty Images for TechCrunch)

This Israel-based startup helps protect your data from being stolen off your gadgets. Imagine you're at a coffee shop and working on the public WiFi. Only sometimes those WiFi networks are fake and can be used to access personal data on your laptop. CoroNet's software comes to the rescue by analyzing more than 300 characteristics of the WiFi network you are using to ensure safe surfing.


Biobots

Danny Cabrera, CEO of BioBots, shows off his innovative 3D printer.Danny Cabrera, CEO of BioBots, shows off his innovative 3D printer. (Photo: Noam Galai/Getty Images for TechCrunch)

This sounds like something from a futuristic movie: The Philadelphia startup's 3D printers enable hospitals to actually print human organs. During their demo at the conference, they printed an exact replica of Van Gogh's missing ear. BioBots can also print living tissues to help scientists further medical research.


Nikola Labs

Will Zell, co-founder of Nikola Labs, explains his company's mission during a presentation.Will Zell, co-founder of Nikola Labs, explains his company's mission during a presentation. (Photo: Noam Galai/Getty Images for TechCrunch)

You're out and about running errands and your cell phone's battery is dying. We've all been there. But what if you could take WiFi signals in the air and convert them into power for your phone? That's what this startup hopes to do: Ohio-based Nikola Labs says they can harvest those signals into actual, usable energy. Instant charging wherever you are? Sign us up!


EveryLayer

Founder and CEO of EveryLayer, Mark Summer wants to bring high-speed web access to remote villages.Founder and CEO of EveryLayer, Mark Summer wants to bring high-speed web access to remote villages. (Photo: Noam Galai/Getty Images for TechCrunch)

Getting high-speed Internet to developing communities has proven difficult. It's not like fiber-optic cable wires are running to every tiny African village. Enter EveryLayer. The San Francisco company's proprietary, cloud-based platform piggybacks on existing WiFi and cell phone networks to help deliver web access to the most remote parts of the world.

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