A lubber grasshopper holding onto a scrub oak branch A lubber grasshopper holding onto a scrub oak branch A lubber grasshopper holding onto a scrub oak branch (Photo: Tyler Fox/Shutterstock)

Would you eat a grasshopper?

An Israeli entrepreneur is hoping the insect becomes part of your daily diet.

When you think about grasshoppers – because, after all, who doesn't think about grasshoppers? – you usually just picture them as insects in your back yard.

But one guy – Israeli entrepreneur Dror Tamir – believes in the success of grasshoppers as food. Yep, food. So much so, that he's building an entire farm dedicated to it.

And, he says, he's already gotten some pretty major interest – from companies such as Ikea, Whole Foods and Pepsico. “With the technology we developed, farming grasshoppers is so efficient and modular we could feed the entire world,” said Tamir, a graduate of Tel Aviv University in Israel.

But, why, you might ask? One word – protein! Grasshoppers contain 70% protein, with some essential amino acids, iron and omega-3 thrown in. Tamir's idea involves turning grasshoppers into a protein powder that can be sold as a supplement or an additive in sports drinks, for example.

Tamir's no stranger to turning healthy food into a venture. He's already developed a startup called Plate My Meal, which is a detailed resource for parents struggling to feed their kids healthy food.

So, what's on the menu tonight? Meatballs? Chicken? Salmon? Grasshoppers?

Bon appetit!

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Would you eat a grasshopper?
An Israeli entrepreneur is hoping the insect becomes part of your daily diet.