This young woman eating a salad would feel right at home expensing a meal at WeWork. This young woman eating a salad would feel right at home expensing a meal at WeWork. This young woman eating a salad would feel right at home expensing a meal at WeWork. (Photo: Ross Helen)

This company will pay for your meal … unless it’s meat

Where's the beef? Not at WeWork, that's for sure.

Companies hoping to woo the top recruits often shower them with the best of modern amenities – limitless snacks, ping pong tables, even nap rooms. Many also allow employees to expense their meals. But one startup is putting the kibosh on ... well, kabob.

This week, the office sharing firm WeWork has said that it will cease paying for employees meat meals. "New research indicates that avoiding meat is one of the biggest things an individual can do to reduce their personal environmental impact, even more than switching to a hybrid car," WeWork's co-founder Miguel McKelvey wrote in an email to the company's 6,000 employees.

According to Bloomberg News, "WeWork’s decision follows the company’s recent internal drives to reducing plastic usage, and redistribute waste food from its events to good causes."

The move comes at the same time that the company is launching a small retail space they are testing out at three of their New York shared office spaces. The shop, called WeMRKT, sells healthy snacks – many of which are made by WeWork members. Some of the products currently being sold there include: Barnana, a plantain chip company dedicated to eliminating food waste on organic banana farms; Misfit Juicery, which makes cold-pressed juice using less-than-perfect produce that farmers are unable to sell; and Sunniva Super Coffee, an organic brew fortified with whey protein and coconut oil.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BkvyPL5ho_f/?taken-by=drinksupercoffee

WeWork was co-founded by Israeli entrepreneur Adam Neumann in 2010. With 270 locations in 90 cities, the company is valued at north of $20 billion. Companies worth more than a billion dollars are considered part of a rare breed of startup known as a unicorn, an animal that is sure not to be found on any menu at WeWork.

Adam Neumann WeWork co-founder and CEO Adam Neumann talks about his company at the TechCrunch Disrupt 2015 conference. (Photo: Noam Galai / Getty Images for TechCrunch)

MORE FROM THE GRAPEVINE:

Photos and SlideshowsPhotos and Slideshows

Related Topics: Environment, Food News

This company will pay for your meal … unless it’s meat
Where's the beef? Not at WeWork, that's for sure.