Better Juice reduces all types of sugar in juice (PRNewsfoto/Better Juice) Better Juice reduces all types of sugar in juice (PRNewsfoto/Better Juice) Better Juice's conversion technique reduces all types of sugar in juice. (PRNewsfoto/Better Juice)

Lose the sugar, keep the sweetness with new tech

Fructose, sucrose and other sugars are converted to reduce the sugar load in drinks like orange and apple juice.

Popular juices like orange and apple would seem to be beneficial for your diet. They are, after all, naturally sweet, and they're full of the same vitamins and minerals you find in fresh produce. But they also contain nearly an ounce (25 grams) of sugar per 1-cup serving, and they're lower in fiber due to traditional juicing methods.

So, you can't have it all when it comes to juice. Or ... can you?

A new food-tech startup called Better Juice, in a joint venture with Hebrew University of Jerusalem, has developed a process that reduces the load of simple sugars in orange juice. It does this by converting monosaccharides and disaccharides (fructose, glucose, and sucrose) into prebiotic and other non-digestible fibers and sugars, while keeping the juicy flavor of the beverage.

Sugar has become a hot topic because of the role it plays in diabetes and obesity. Sugar has become a hot topic because of the role it plays in diabetes and obesity. (Photo: Evgeniy Agarkov/Shutterstock)

"This natural non-fermentative process occurs without adding or removing ingredients," says Eran Blachinsky, the Israel-born founder and CEO of Better Juice. "It also will not alter the flavor or aroma of the juice."

The company is supported by The Kitchen FoodTech Hub, a business incubator whose goal is to nourish promising food-tech ventures that can disrupt the global food system – making it more productive, more affordable, more sustainable and healthier.

The kitchen The Kitchen FoodTech Hub in Israel. (Photo: Zach Pontz)

"Consumers, especially children, enjoy drinking natural juices but are not always aware of the less nutritious aspects of juice," Blachinsky said. "They want the whole package – great flavor, health and natural ingredients, including the fibers that are essential part of fruits."

The company plans to market the technology to fruit juice producers and, eventually, to cafés and restaurants.

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Lose the sugar, keep the sweetness with new tech
Fructose, sucrose and other sugars are converted to reduce the sugar load in drinks like orange and apple juice.