The MarginProbe being used during a lumpectomy.The MarginProbe being used during a lumpectomy.The MarginProbe is being hailed as a revolutionary device in the battle against breast cancer. (Photo: MarginProbe)

This device is giving new hope to breast cancer patients

MarginProbe is being called the biggest advancement in breast cancer treatment in a generation.

A new device is bringing hope to breast cancer patients with its promise of making the fight against the disease more efficient.

Developed by Israeli company Dune Medical Devices, the MarginProbe helps surgeons by providing real-time confirmation that the skin around the removed tissue is clean and free of cancerous cells, eliminating the need for follow-up surgery.

The reason follow-up surgery is needed is that until now, there's been no surefire way to know if the tissue around the tumor, called the margin, is free of cancerous cells. Following the initial surgery, tissue is sent to a lab for tests, and patients must wait several weeks for the results. If it turns out the margins are cancerous, then follow-up surgery is necessary.

"It really is very disappointing and it is a difficult conversation to have with a patient,” Dr. Freya Schnabel, director of breast surgery at New York University's Langone Medical Center, said of having to inform a patient that a second surgery is necessary.

A closeup shot of the MarginProbe.The MarginProbe consists of two components – a console and this probe. (Photo: MarginProbe)

Traditionally, one in four women who undergo a lumpectomy procedure requires follow-up surgery, but that number is reduced by 51 percent when MarginProbe is used during the initial procedure, Dune Medical Devices said.

The product is now being used by more than 100 hospitals in the U.S. In just a few years, Dune said the device has already been used on more than 10,000 breast cancer patients – with the hope that many more will benefit from it in the future.

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