Design

Peek into the future: Architect's skyscraper design is mind-blowing

Photos show cylindrical high-rise would feature spas, vertical gardens and show-stopping architecture.

This curvy tower in Tel Aviv will feature a lush vertical garden. This curvy tower in Tel Aviv will feature a lush vertical garden. This curvy tower in Tel Aviv will feature a lush vertical garden. (Photo: David Tajchman)

Paris-based Belgian architect David Tajchman has created a conceptual high-rise building in Tel Aviv, Israel, intended to soar high above the city's concentration of Bauhaus buildings – three- and four-story homes – to keep up with the bustling city's growth. The cylindrical tower named Gran Mediterraneo aims to be an innovative skyscraper that combines luxurious living, sustainable design and an abundance of native plants and vegetation.

The project would bring together housing units, office and retail space, parking and more.The Gran Mediterraneo project would bring together housing units, office and retail space, electric vehicle driverless parking and more. (Photo: David Tajchman)

The skyscraper would offer a mix of programs and cutting-edge amenities, including apartments, a hotel, a fully automated car park, public charging stations for electric vehicles, farming and public gardens, several high-end bars and restaurants, swimming pools, Dead Sea spas and more. The automated public car park would be the first charging station for public and shared electric driverless vehicles in the city. The Gran Mediterraneo also includes co-working spaces for offices and local Israeli startups, as well as designated spaces for events and educational functions.

A view from inside David Tajchman’s proposed project. Vast floor-to-ceiling windows overlook Tel Aviv. (Photo: David Tajchman)

Unlike most skyscrapers that are made of lifeless horizontal blocks stacked on top of the other and wrapped with mirrored glass, the tower has a cellular appearance that's filled with native Mediterranean vegetation, which gives it an organic and futuristic look. According to Tajchman, the tower's glass doesn't just give the tower futuristic appeal, but it would reflect Tel Aviv's famous sunlight and keep inside temperatures cooler. "The Gran Mediterraneo breaks with the global and usual stacking of horizontal slabs wrapped with mirrored glass, aiming to renew the Tel Aviv skyline with a 'UNESCO proclaimed White City' specific vertical architecture," Tajchman told Arch Daily.

The white concrete facade is a nod to Tel Aviv’s Bauhaus legacy.The white concrete facade is a nod to Tel Aviv’s Bauhaus legacy. (Photo: David Tajchman)

Tajchman's architectural work is all about offering unexpected solutions to demands by using handcrafted models and digital tools fused with a bit of futurism. His big plans for Gran Mediterraneo follow suit. While this building is only a concept right now, Tajchman hopes it becomes a reality some day.

The architect's primary goal with the project is to enhance Tel Aviv's skyline and give contemporary skyscrapers the same architectural merit as the city’s famous Bauhaus buildings. “My project is built in white concrete to pay tribute to this architecture,” says Tajchman.

Lindsay E. Brown is the managing editor of Eco-Chick, the web’s first ethical fashion, beauty and travel site for women. She has written for Whole Living Magazine, Edible, and Cottages & Gardens. Lindsay has been featured as a fashion and beauty expert on the Veria Living Network. Lindsay holds a BS in Global Business Studies and Marketing from Manhattan College, and received the 2012 Honors Award at Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.

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