Design

Take a tour of this mysterious, eco-friendly home

Room to room, this home is full of surprises and contradictions.

This three-level home outside Tel Aviv is as charming as it is earth-friendly. This three-level home outside Tel Aviv is as charming as it is earth-friendly. This three-level home outside Tel Aviv is as charming as it is earth-friendly. (Photo: Idan Milman and Itay Sikolski for Israelevitz Architects)

The chameleon has few rivals when it comes to corporeal quirks. The same can be said for a mysterious house on the outskirts of Tel Aviv, Israel. From outside to inside and room to room, the home appears to adapt to its surroundings in a fashion that's ultra-modern, welcoming and environmentally responsible.

Lead architects Dan and Hila Israelevitz of Israelevitz Architects were charged with creating a planet-friendly home for a family of five on a relatively small lot of land. The duo designed the home's facade to be private and camouflaged. There are no discernible windows, and the front door blends in with a plane of wooden trellises. With an exterior made of concrete tiles, black plaster and trellises, one would think the interior of the home would follow this cooler, subdued style. But this home is remarkably versatile.

"We try to create contrasts when it comes to our design approach," Dan Israelevitz told From The Grapevine. "We chose to design the facade of the home to be private and hidden from the street. On the other hand, we made sure to fill the house with light."

The floor-to-ceiling glass wall makes it difficult to distinguish the outside from the inside. The floor-to-ceiling glass wall makes it difficult to distinguish the outside from the inside. (Photo: Idan Milman and Itay Sikolski for Israelevitz Architects)

Inside, the first-floor layout is surprisingly open with ample light and natural views to take in. The floor-to-ceiling glass wall overlooks a pool that runs nearly the length of the home and gives the feeling that the outside and inside are one. Israelevitz says he enjoyed designing the large glass walls surrounding the ground floor most.

The kitchen boasts hardware-free white cabinets, a stainless steel center island and white floors which make it difficult to make the distinction between the interior and the white pavement directly outside. Cantilevered stairs wrapped in natural oak are anchored to the exposed concrete walls on one side and bordered by a clear glass railing on the other.

The home opens up with ample light and views of the great outdoors. The home opens up with ample light and views of the great outdoors. (Photo: Idan Milman and Itay Sikolski for Israelevitz Architects)

Upstairs, the naturally lit master bedroom offers near panoramic views of a bustling downtown Tel Aviv, providing the open and airy continuity from the first floor. "The shades allow you to control the sunlight coming in," Israelevitz said. The master bath features a free-standing tub, which provides a warm accent set against black mosaic tiles on the floor and black natural stone walls. A glass wall divides and connects the master bedroom.

A stylish and sleek master bath. A stylish and sleek master bath. (Photo: Idan Milman and Itay Sikolski for Israelevitz Architects)

The basement holds a recreation room and bedrooms for the family’s two older children. The sound-proofed entertainment room was inspired by an English pub and is equipped with dark wood wall paneling, a wine bar and flat screen. The cool color palette of the secluded space is reminiscent of earthy tones found beneath the earth's surface.

The home wasn't just designed to blend into its environment, it was designed to tread lightly on the planet, too. "Due to the Mediterranean weather we chose to use the venture effect to cool the house," Israelevitz said. "The entire roof is covered in solar panels which make up about 80 percent of the home's electricity consumption and water heating." Its pool is heated by a repeated energy air-conditioning system which conserves energy.

The basement serves as a fully functional entertainment room. The basement serves as a fully functional entertainment room. (Photo: Idan Milman and Itay Sikolski for Israelevitz Architects)

Lindsay E. Brown is the managing editor of Eco-Chick, the web’s first ethical fashion, beauty and travel site for women. She has written for Whole Living Magazine, Edible, and Cottages & Gardens. Lindsay has been featured as a fashion and beauty expert on the Veria Living Network. Lindsay holds a BS in Global Business Studies and Marketing from Manhattan College, and received the 2012 Honors Award at Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.

The opinions expressed in blogs and reader comments are those of the writers and do not reflect the opinions of FromtheGrapevine.com. While we have reviewed the content to ensure it complies with our Terms and Conditions, From the Grapevine is not responsible for the accuracy of any of the information.

MORE FROM THE GRAPEVINE:

Photos and SlideshowsPhotos and Slideshows

Related Topics: Architecture

comments powered by Disqus