At left, Ahuva Mintz and her mom show off some of the designs while at the Kensington Market in Toronto. At right, Mintz poses for a selfie. At left, Ahuva Mintz and her mom show off some of the designs while at the Kensington Market in Toronto. At right, Mintz poses for a selfie. At left, Ahuva Mintz and her mom show off some of the designs while at the Kensington Market in Toronto. At right, Mintz poses for a selfie. (Photo: Courtesy Flora)

Designer uses leftover and recycled fabric to create striking jewelry

The creative one-of-a-kind designs are surprisingly affordable.

Looking for beautiful, one-of-a-kind jewelry that won’t break your budget?

Look no further than the exquisite designs created by artist Ahuva Mintz, the founder of Flora. At 26 years old, Mintz has a growing business that any young entrepreneur would admire. Each piece is completely individualized – with distinct colors, shapes and sizes. You’ll find deep and bold colors mixed with floral patterns, innovatively intertwined to create statement pieces.

Even more, Mintz is focused on reusing and recycling materials. “You don’t always have to buy new products or new things to make something beautiful,” Mintz told From The Grapevine.

Born in Canada and now living in Israel, Mintz said she thought up the idea for the designs during a trip with a friend. “I was traveling in India about three years ago and it really all started there. I came across pieces of fabric. My friend that I was traveling with was trying to sew herself a shirt," Mintz said. The two discovered that tailors were more than willing to hand over leftover fabrics. Questioning why such gorgeous wares should go to waste, Mintz set to work transforming the cloth into beautiful creations.

Ahuva Mintz says some of her work is inspired by African designs.Ahuva Mintz says some of her work is inspired by African designs. (Photo: Omer Stein)

Each of Mintz’s designs is its own work of art. Mintz frequents the flea market in Jaffa, a section of Tel Aviv, for fabrics that catch her eye. “My concept is leftover, recycled fabric and second-hand clothing. I believe in recycling," Mintz said. “I find things at the flea market and I do look for things that I like – bright colors, that I started with in India. I happened to really like African styles, floral prints, colors that are very bright, vibrant and kind of loud. Every single piece is totally different and one of a kind.”

Recycling is a key part of Mintz’s personal mantra as well as her business plan. “I feel very connected to nature, since I was a child I had this love for flowers and plants," she said.

"You will see lots of floral prints in my jewelry and especially in my wardrobe. I know it is true to live in sync and in harmony with nature. I did not need to learn to recycle anywhere, it just makes perfect sense. I do remember learning about ecological footprints in elementary school and instantly identifying my way of being to this concept. Plus I find that today, lots of the fabrics are simple, synthetic and dull.”

Ahuva often serves as a model for her own creations.Ahuva often serves as a model for her own creations. (Photo: Flora)

Mintz refers to her design scheme as minimal, but the effort and creativity that goes into each piece is far from simplistic. “I use rope for the interior of the necklaces," she said. “I cut and glue different lengths of rope to create the shape and size that I want. I don’t measure the rope; each one is unique depending on my idea at that moment.”

What inspires Mintz? “The beauty of feminine boldness," she said. “I especially admire African designs; the patterns and the powerful color combinations. I once came across the designs of Anita Quansah. When you wear these designs it makes you sit up straight and feel majestic. This is what I want to create.”

While Mintz is currently studying physical education at Wingate College in Israel, she hopes to one day turn her jewelry business into a full-time gig. Those interested can purchase her items online, but Mintz says she's looking for a brick-and-mortar store as well. “I want to find a permanent place to sell my jewelry," she said. "I believe I have a great product and I’m excited to make this my main focus instead of keeping it on the sidelines of my life. I want to be creating new designs every week.”

Ahuva Mintz has figured out a way to reuse fabric in her jewelry designs.Ahuva Mintz has figured out a way to reuse fabric in her jewelry designs. (Photo: Omer Stein)

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Designer uses leftover and recycled fabric to create striking jewelry
The creative one-of-a-kind designs are surprisingly affordable.