Tracking down everything ever said by Albert Einstein can be difficult. Tracking down everything ever said by Albert Einstein can be difficult. Some of Einstein's papers will be available for viewing in New York. (Photo: AFP/Getty Images)

Einstein gets his own pop-up exhibit in Manhattan

The Morgan Museum & Library features some very rare items belonging to the beloved genius.

This year marks the 100th anniversary of Albert Einstein's theory of relativity. To celebrate, some artists are baking cakes and creating paintings, while institutions across the world are opening special exhibits. In Israel, for example, a museum just launched an exhibit that allows children to get a glimpse inside Einstein's head. And today, New Yorkers are getting a new Einstein exhibit as well.

Beginning Tuesday and lasting until Oct. 16, the Morgan Library & Museum in Manhattan will be hosting a pop-up Einstein exhibit. The micro-exhibit will feature a trio of Einstein ephemera.

The first is a letter written by Einstein to astronomer Erwin Finlay Freundlich, who was attempting to confirm the general theory. One of 25 such letters in the Morgan’s collection, Einstein questions Freundlich’s methods, which were ultimately unsuccessful.

On the left, a photograph signed and inscribed by Einstein; on the left a letter Einstein wrote to Erwin Finlay Freundlich.On the left, a photograph signed and inscribed by Einstein; on the right, a letter Einstein wrote to Erwin Finlay Freundlich. (Photo: Herman Mishkin/Private Collection)

In addition to the letter, the pop-up show includes a very rare written summation of the special theory in the scientist’s own hand. Also featured is a photograph inscribed by Einstein in 1921 while he was in the United States to deliver speeches and lectures. He also used the American trip to raise awareness for the newly established Hebrew University in Jerusalem, of which he was a co-founder and where his archives are now housed.

"The Morgan has in its collection a vast array of important documents related to the history of science including items by Galileo and Sir Isaac Newton," the Morgan's Patrick Milliman told From The Grapevine. "The Einstein archive at the Morgan is another example. His general theory changed the world forever in so many ways that we thought its 100th anniversary should not go unacknowledged at the museum. We hope visitors will come by and enjoy this delightful little exhibition."

One such visitor is Aviva Miller, a dean at a private school in Manhattan. "What's more New York City than a pop-up? This time it's a museum celebrating Albert Einstein's life and mind," she told From The Grapevine. "I'm thrilled to be able to add the Morgan's exhibit to my summer 2016 bucket list."

An autographed copy of the world’s most famous formula, the general theory of relativity: E= mc2.An autographed copy of the world’s most famous formula, the general theory of relativity: E= mc2. (Photo: Private Collection)

The Morgan Library & Museum – located on Madison Avenue at 36th Street – began as the private library of financier Pierpont Morgan, one of the preeminent collectors and cultural benefactors in the United States. Today it is a museum, research library, music venue, architectural landmark and historic site. With the 2006 reopening of its renovated campus, designed by renowned Italian architect Renzo Piano, the Morgan reaffirmed its role as an important repository for the history, art and literature of Western civilization from 4000 B.C.E. to the 21st century.

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